NTC's 2014-2015 Course Delivery Schedule Now Available

The NTC is pleased to announce that it has published its course delivery schedule through calendar year 2015. This schedule includes Safety, Safeguards, Protective Force, and Management and Instructional Training (MIT) courses.

Hosting NTC Training

The NTC invites DOE sites, field elements, and organizations with the appropriate facilities to host training. If your organization is interested in hosting a scheduled NTC course, please submit formal communication from the Federal authority to the NTC Director.

Delivery Method Filter:

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FIT - Foreign Interactions Courses and Training

FIT-110, Foreign Access Central Tracking System Training

Delivery Method: Instructor Led Course
Length in Hours: 16
Description: This beginner-level course provides training for new or inexperienced users of FACTS (Foreign Access Central Tracking System). The course covers the major tools of FACTS and incorporates instructor-led, practical applications and review/practice activities designed to improve users' competency level in FACTS. Topics include: Lesson 1: Introduction and Overview of FACTS, Lesson 2: FV&A Management and Tracking, Lesson 3: Reports, Lesson 4: Other Links of the FACTS Workstation. REQUIREMENT: FACTS account established with HS-72 (username and password).
Audience: DOE and DOE-contractor personnel authorized to use FACTS to enter biographical and request information, provide review and approval input, and fulfill reporting requirements regarding foreign nationals on visits or assignments to DOE facilities.
Goals & Objectives: Upon successful completion of the course, students will understand :1) Basic knowledge of the main features of the FACTS system. 2) How to use the Foreign Visits and Assignments (FV&A) Management Tools and FV&A Request Tools to create requests, addendums, approvals/inputs, and close out requests in FACTS. 3) How to generate a variety of reports from FACTS data, using an array of parameters. 4) How to use the remaining links of the FACTS Workstation not covered in detail in the first three lessons.
Prerequisites: None

FIT-110DW, Foreign Access Central Tracking System Training

Delivery Method: Instructor Led Course
Length in Hours: 16
Description: THIS IS AN INSTRUCTOR LED COURSE VIA WEBEX/INTERNET TAUGHT OVER TWO DAYS .This beginner-level course provides training for new or inexperienced users of FACTS (Foreign Access Central Tracking System). The course covers the major tools of FACTS and incorporates instructor-led, practical applications and review/practice activities designed to improve users' competency level in FACTS. Topics include: Lesson 1: Introduction and Overview of FACTS, Lesson 2: FV&A Management and Tracking, Lesson 3: Reports, Lesson 4: Other Links of the FACTS Workstation. REQUIREMENT: FACTS account established with HS-72 (username and password). Prior to taking this course, students are required to complete GEN-101DW to ensure system compatibility. Enrollment is available at https://lms.ntc.doe.gov/u/default.aspx.
Audience: DOE and DOE-contractor personnel authorized to use FACTS to enter biographical and request information, provide review and approval input, and fulfill reporting requirements regarding foreign nationals on visits or assignments to DOE facilities.
Goals & Objectives: DOE and DOE-contractor personnel authorized to use FACTS to enter biographical and request information, provide review and approval input, and fulfill reporting requirements regarding foreign nationals on visits or assignments to DOE facilities.
Prerequisites: None

FIT-130DE, Foreign Visits and Assignments Host Training

Delivery Method: eLearning
Length in Hours: 1.5
Description: This eLearning course focuses on the responsibilities and requirements for hosting foreign nationals under DOE's Unclassified Foreign Visits and Assignments (FV&A) Program. The training is designed to provide timely information using a delivery method that can be accessed on demand and completed within a short timeframe. Topics are divided into the major areas of host activities and responsibilities in the following phases: Prior to the visit/assignment, during the visit/assignment, and after the visit/assignment. Four lessons are included, with each lesson followed by interactive review questions and the NTC Student Feedback Form. Links to downloadable forms, job aids, and additional resources are provided. Please note that this course is to be used as a training resource only. Completion of the course does not qualify or certify you as an FV&A host; your site has its own requirements for FV&A hosts that you must also fulfill. Please consult your site Unclassified FV&A Coordinator for further information on host qualifications.
Audience: Individuals who serve (or wish to qualify) as hosts of foreign nationals at DOE facilities.
Goals & Objectives: Upon successful completion of the course, students will understand the responsibilities and tasks required of hosts before, during, and after a visit or assignment.
Prerequisites: None
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General Courses and Training

GEN-101DW, Introduction to Distance Learning

Delivery Method: Instructor Led Course
Length in Hours: 0.75
Description: This introductory course is a prerequisite to all Distance Learning courses. Distance Learning takes place in a virtual classroom. Students attend classes using the internet to connect and interact with their instructor. Students will learn to use elements of the Distance Learning tool and be fully prepared for future Distance Learning courses. It will include the troubleshooting of any issues students have with access to Distance Learning.
Audience: Anyone who plans to attend a distance learning course.
Goals & Objectives: Upon successful completion of this course, students will have an understanding of: 1) The elements of the Distance Learning tool and be fully prepared for future Distance Learning courses. 2) Troubleshooting issues that students have with access to Distance Learning.
Prerequisites: None

LMS Training POC eCourse

Delivery Method: eLearning
Length in Hours: 0.75
Description: This introductory course provides training for new or inexperienced training points of contact (POCs). The course covers the basic tools required to administer student records and requests for training. REQUIREMENT: An LMS POC account must be created prior to accessing the administrator site.
Audience: DOE Training POCs
Goals & Objectives: Upon successful completion of this course, students will understand the eight basic activities that Training POCs are required to perform in the NTC LMS. To receive credit for this eCourse, students will need to complete the eight activities and the NTC Student Feedback Form.
Prerequisites: None
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ISC - Information Security Courses and Training

ISC-105DE, Technical Surveillance Countermeasures Awareness

Delivery Method: eLearning
Length in Hours: 1
Description: This eLearning course provides a general awareness of the DOE Technical Surveillance Countermeasures as it relates to DOE and DOE-contractor personnel.
Audience: DOE and DOE-contractor personnel
Goals & Objectives: Upon successful completion of this course, students will be made aware of a number of TSCM topics. Topics include the purpose of the TSCM program; the roles and responsibilities of TSCM personnel; services offered by the TCSM program; responding to and reporting a TCSM incident; responsibilities of DOE and DOE-contractor personnel to TCSM; the value of DOE technology and information, and the current threats and targets.
Prerequisites: None

ISC-106DE, Introduction to Special Access Programs (SAPs)

Delivery Method: eLearning
Length in Hours: 1.5
Description: This 1-1/2 hour course is an introduction to special access programs or SAPs. It is designed to give students a familiarity with SAPs. The following topics are covered: - What SAPs are - The SAP Life Cycle - Who Approves SAPs - Roles and Responsibilities of Key Individuals Involved in SAPs - Authoritative Documents - Levels of Protection
Audience: DOE and DOE-contractor personnel
Goals & Objectives: Upon successful completion of this course, the student will know: 1) the definition and purpose of SAPs; 2) how SAPs are established; 3) the types and categories of SAPs; 4) access authorization requirements; 5)the steps in the SAP life cycle; 6) the roles and responsibilities of individuals in the SAP process; 7) SAP protection levels.
Prerequisites: None

ISC-121DE, Introduction to Classified Matter Protection and Control (CMPC)

Delivery Method: eLearning
Length in Hours: 3
Description: This unclassified, introductory course provides the basic information required to perform CMPC Program functions. The course includes an overview of Information Security and the CMPC Program, as well as the following protection and control elements applied to classified matter: generation and marking; protection and storage; transmission; reproduction and destruction; and formal accountability. Also included is an introduction to unclassified controlled information (UCI)—specifically, Official Use Only (OUO) and Unclassified Controlled Nuclear Information (UCNI). The course incorporates knowledge checks and tests during all lessons to reinforce student learning and provides immediate feedback and remediation. The course also provides links to DOE and national directives, glossary terms, and document examples. A passing grade of 80% is required for course completion.
Audience: DOE and DOE-contractor personnel who create, handle, or work with classified matter.
Goals & Objectives: Upon successful completion of this course, students will be familiar with: 1) Information Security elements of the DOE S&S Program. 2) CMPC general principles and associated roles. 3) CMPC considerations and procedures associated with generating classified matter. 4) CMPC markings applied to classified matter. 5) Basic storage requirements for classified matter. 6) Approved methods for the transmission of classified matter. 7) DOE procedures for reproduction and destruction of classified matter. 8) Basic requirements associated with formal accountability of classified matter. 9) Requirements for protecting and controlling UCI.
Prerequisites: None

ISC-141DE, Operations Security (OPSEC) Overview

Delivery Method: eLearning
Length in Hours: 1
Description: This course provides an overview of the OPSEC process and shows how a viable OPSEC program can facilitate successful operations within an organization. The course can be used for initial OPSEC orientations, periodic OPSEC refresher training, and general security education or motivational purposes.
Audience: DOE and DOE-contractor personnel
Goals & Objectives: Upon successful completion of this course, students will be familiar with: 1) The OPSEC concept, history and objectives of OPSEC, key program directives, and elements of the DOE OPSEC program. 2) OPSEC program implementation requirements. 3) The OPSEC analytical process.
Prerequisites: None

ISC-202DW, Legal Aspects of Inquiries

Delivery Method: Instructor Led Course
Length in Hours: 3
Description: This unclassified, introductory-level, live virtual classroom course (delivered with Webex), with accompanying video, provides an understanding of the legal issues associated with inquiries into incidents of security concern. The course's purpose is to assist in the conduct of inquiries that protect DOE security interests, without violating the 4th or 5th amendment legal rights of DOE or DOE-contractor employees. Included are review questions for which the minimum passing score is 80%. Prior to taking this course, students are required to complete GEN-101DW to ensure system compatibility. Enrollment is available at https://lms.ntc.doe.gov/u/default.aspx.
Audience: DOE and DOE-contractor S&S personnel as well as CMOC points of contact (POCs)
Goals & Objectives: Upon successful completion of this course material, students will understand: 1) The legal parameters of an interview as they apply to the inquiry process 2) The concept of search and seizure as it applies to the inquiry process 3) Civil liability as it applies to the conduct of the inquiries 4) Obstruction of justice and false statements as they apply to the inquiry process
Prerequisites: None

ISC-202DW, Legal Aspects of Inquiries - Exam

Delivery Method: eLearning
Length in Hours: 0.5
Description: This is an exam for students of the ISC-202DW course delivered in a virtual classroom.
Audience: Students of the ISC-202DW course.
Goals & Objectives: This is an exam for students of the ISC-202DW course delivered in a virtual classroom.
Prerequisites: None

ISC-206, Special Program Security Officer (SPSO)

Delivery Method: Instructor Led Course
Length in Hours: 40
Description: The course prepares participants to function as Special Program Security Officers (SPSOs) for Special Access Programs (SAPs) and Work for Others programs through classroom instruction and hands-on training. REQUIRED: There is read-ahead material that all registered students will receive about four weeks prior to the class. Students are required to read this material before the first day of the class. RECOMMENDED: It is also recommended that students take the following NTC classroom courses, either before or after taking ISC-222, to enhance their education as an SPSO: ISC-121DE Introduction to Classified Matter Protection and Control (CMPC); ISC-221 Classified Matter Protection and Control I; ISC-301 Conduct of Inquiries; PHY-128DB Introduction to Basic Survey; and PHY-130 Basic Survey.
Audience: DOE/NNSA and DOE/NNSA-contractor personnel
Goals & Objectives: Upon successful completion of this course, students will understand: 1) basic requirements applicable to special programs(associated terms, directives, roles, and responsibilities); 2) actions necessary to prepare for the receipt of a new program; 3) the required security plan outlining the protection measures for program operations; 4) the process for requesting and receiving approvals for personnel to access special programs; 5) the process for coordinating visits and associated activities within a cleared facility; 6) basic CMPC requirements for classified matter; 7) Cyber Security requirements associated with special programs; 8) how to conduct security self-assessments and coordinate security inspections of special programs; 9) reporting requirements upon discovery of an Incident of Security Concern; 10) the general process of conducting training/briefings supporting special program security requirements; and 11) procedures associated with formal program termination.
Prerequisites: ISC-106DE, Introduction to Special Access Programs (SAPs)

ISC-221, Classified Matter Protection and Control I

Delivery Method: Instructor Led Course
Length in Hours: 16
Description: This unclassified, intermediate-level course emphasizes development of skills needed to handle, protect, and control classified matter as part of the Classified Matter Protection and Control (CMPC) Program. It includes a review of ISC-121DE, Introduction to Classified Matter Protection and Control, as well as reinforcement at a "working-level" comprehension of various requirements applied when protecting or controlling classified matter; marking classified documents; performing CMPC-related self-assessments; creating, storing, reproducing, transmitting, and destroying, classified matter; as well as knowing requirements applied to control systems and accountability of certain classified matter. In addition, the course introduces students, at a "familiarity level" of comprehension, to potential Incidents of Security Concern that relate directly to CMPC requirements. Included are activities and a final examination, requiring a minimum score of 80%.
Audience: DOE and DOE-contractor S&S personnel responsible for protecting classified matter, as well as CMPC points of contact (POCs) who are responsible for implementing/coordinating CMPC functions.
Goals & Objectives: Upon successful completion of this course, students will be familiar with: 1) the goal and purpose of the CMPC Program. 2) the access authorization requirements for classified matter. 3) CMPC considerations and procedures associated with generating and marking classified matter. 4) applications of self-assessments related to CMPC. 5) DOE requirements for the creation of classified matter. 6) storage requirements for classified matter. 7) reproduction and destruction of classified matter. 8) CMPC requirements for receiving and transmitting classified matter. 9) control systems and accountability requirements for classified matter. 10) Controlled Unclassified Information.
Prerequisites: ISC-121DE, Introduction to Classified Matter Protection and Control (CMPC)

ISC-241, Operations Security (OPSEC)

Delivery Method: Instructor Led Course
Length in Hours: 24
Description: This course focuses on resources, policies, and training that deny unauthorized individuals or groups access to classified and sensitive-unclassified information. Emphasis is placed on the exploitable sources of information normally available to an adversary and on cost-effective countermeasures to deny or delay the availability of such information. The course requires a minimum score of 80% based on administered testing results and completion of a practical exercise.
Audience: DOE/NNSA and DOE/NNSA-contractor personnel
Goals & Objectives: Upon successful completion of this course, students will: 1) understand DOE OPSEC policy; 2) know and be able to apply the five-step OPSEC process; 3) know the DOE/NNSA OPSEC organization and functions; 4) be familiar with methods for effectively assessing the strengths and weaknesses of an OPSEC Program; and 5) understand the interrelationship of risk management and OPSEC.
Prerequisites: ISC-141DE, Operations Security (OPSEC) Overview

ISC-301, Conduct of Inquiries

Delivery Method: Instructor Led Course
Length in Hours: 32
Description: This course addresses policies and procedures applicable to inquiries conducted to determine whether an Incident of Security Concern (IOSC) has occurred. The course addresses all aspects of conducting inquiries, for example, purpose and methods of conducting interviews; the legal parameters of conducting inquiries; report writing; and reporting requirements. Practical exercises reinforce these and other inquiry procedures.
Audience: DOE/NNSA and DOE/NNSA-contractor personnel who are or will be responsible for conducting inquiries into Incidents of Security Concern.
Goals & Objectives: Upon successful completion of this course, students will: 1) be familiar with the DOE directives related to the conduct of inquiries; 2) understand the scope and purpose of conducting inquiries; 3) possess a working knowledge of methods for conducting inquiries; and 4) demonstrate, through practical exercises, the ability to conduct inquiries and produce reports, along with accompanying documentation.
Prerequisites: ISC-202DW, Legal Aspects of Inquiries
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MCA - Nuclear Material Control and Accountability Courses and Training

MCA-101DE, Introduction to Nuclear Material Control & Accountability

Delivery Method: eLearning
Length in Hours: 2.5
Description: This beginner-level eLearning course presents the properties and characteristics of nuclear material that are important to safeguards; their categorization and attractiveness levels; current and historical diversity of nuclear material in the DOE complex; the basic requirements for planning, implementing, and evaluating a nuclear material control and accountability (NMC&A) program; the generation, collection, and utilization of nuclear material accountability data; and the control mechanisms used in the detection and timely prevention of unauthorized activities in storing, processing, and transferring nuclear material. Test questions are incorporated into each lesson (nominal passing score of at least 80%). REQUIREMENT: Before taking this eLearning course, participants should have read DOE Order 470.4B Admin Chg 1, Safeguards and Security Program, and DOE Order 474.2 Admin Chg 2, Nuclear Material Control and Accountability.
Audience: DOE and DOE-contractor personnel
Goals & Objectives: Upon successful completion of this course, students will be familiar with: 1) The purpose, history, and current needs of the NMC&A program. 2) The nuclear material found within the DOE Complex and how they are handled and stored. 3) The forms of nuclear material found within the DOE Complex, the purpose and meaning of graded safeguards, and the future of NMC&A within the DOE Complex. 4) The S&S program and administration of the NMC&A program. 5) The basics of nuclear material accountability, including the nuclear material accounting system, the PI process, measurement and measurement control, nuclear material transfers, and material control indicators. 6) How nuclear material control prevents the unauthorized access to, and use of, nuclear material.
Prerequisites: None

MCA-103DE, Transaction Data Systems (TDS)

Delivery Method: eLearning
Length in Hours: 4
Description: This beginner-level eLearning course presents the completion of all lines of DOE/NRC F 741, Nuclear Material Transaction Report, and DOE F DP-740, Automated Data Processing Transaction Sheet-Nuclear Material Transaction Journal. The method of instruction is to step through the reporting of simple transaction scenarios. At the end of each lesson is a test (nominal passing score of at least 80%).
Audience: DOE and DOE-contractor, NRC and NRC-licensee personnel requiring introductory instruction in completion of 741 and 740 forms.
Goals & Objectives: Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to complete 741 and 740 forms for simple transactions.
Prerequisites: None

MCA-110, Basics of Nuclear Material Accountability

Delivery Method: Instructor Led Course
Length in Hours: 32
Description: This beginner-level course includes the following topics: "Generally Accepted Accounting Principles (GAAP)," accounting systems, calculations of accountability values, external and internal transactions, inventory requirements and physical inventories, measurement uncertainties, and reporting principles. Recommendation: Familiarity with DOE O 474.2 Admin Chg 2, Nuclear Material Control and Accountability.
Audience: Entry level/newly assigned DOE or DOE-contractor personnel working in or responsible for nuclear material accountability functions.
Goals & Objectives: Upon successful completion of this course, students will understand: 1) The fundamentals of accounting systems as they relate to NMC&A. 2) Concepts of GAAP as they relate to nuclear material accounting. 3) The relationship of general and subsidiary ledgers as they concern nuclear material accounting. 4) Accounting requirements of external and internal transactions. 5) Inventory requirements and conduct of physical inventories. 6) Calculations of accountability values from nuclear measurement results. 7) The effect of measurement uncertainties on inventory differences; statistical tools and data analysis associated with inventory differences. 8) Reporting of inventory data; general overview and the DOE NMMSS system; DOE documentation and document-retention requirements.
Prerequisites: MCA-101DE, Introduction to Nuclear Material Control & Accountability
MCA-101DC Introduction to Nuclear Material Control and Accountability

MCA-112, Nuclear Material Management and Safeguards System I (NMMSS I)

Delivery Method: Instructor Led Course
Length in Hours: 32
Description: This is an NTC-sponsored course conducted by NAC International, Inc., P.O. Box 922088, Norcross, GA 30092. To register or obtain further information, contact the NTC registrar at (505) 845-2250. This course focuses on the content of the facility-supplied information to the Nuclear Material Management & Safeguards System (NMMSS), the proper documentation for the typical types of nuclear material transfer activity, tools to assist with interpreting the requirements, and the usefulness of the NMMSS report products to the nuclear material accounting organization. Included are exercises and a test following each lesson, requiring a passing score of at least 80%. REQUIREMENTS: Knowledge of the inventory and transaction-reporting procedures of attendees' respective facilities, and of the personnel responsible. Knowledge of how to use a calculator. EQUIPMENT: Each attendee should bring to the course a scientific calculator and a copy of DOE O 474.2 Admin Chg 2, Nuclear Material Control and Accountability. RECOMMENDED: Successful prior completion of MCA-110 Basics of Nuclear Material Accountability.
Audience: DOE and DOE-contractor personnel who have less than two years of experience in the preparation and distribution of the nuclear material reporting source documents and data-processing forms as required by DOE.
Goals & Objectives: Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to work with the NMMSS, including the mechanics of nuclear material accounting and reporting procedures. In addition, students will understand: 1) Use of DOE O 474.2 Admin Chg 2, Nuclear Material Control and Accountability, and other reference tools. 2) Procedures necessary for proper documentation of nuclear material transactions and inventories, adjustments to inventories, programmatic transfers within facilities, onsite gains and losses, and changes in financial responsibility. 3) Other specialized topics such as the procedures for performing reconciliation between the NMMSS and a facility's records. 4) Various NMMSS report products.
Prerequisites: None

MCA-113, Inventory Difference Accounting

Delivery Method: Instructor Led Course
Length in Hours: 16
Description: This course will focus on calculation of Inventory Differences (ID) by reviewing the types of accounting adjustments made during nuclear material processing operations. After a brief review of applicable DOE Orders, metrics, and the basic reasons for ID, several examples will be presented and participants will review and evaluate the IDs. Class problems will be presented and, working in groups, calculate IDs under various processing scenarios. Participants will be asked to develop checklists of activities to be performed for planned processing activities that involve the calculation of IDs. LANMAS transaction codes and specific Material Balance Report Line Item entries will be discussed. Recommendation: Familiarity with DOE O 474.2 Admin Chg 2, Nuclear Material Control and Accountability.
Audience: DOE or DOE-contractor personnel working in or responsible for nuclear material accountability functions that include entering Inventory Difference data into the accountability system.
Goals & Objectives: Upon successful completion of this course, students will understand: 1) Accounting system functions as they relate to Inventory Differences. 2) The relationship of general and subsidiary ledgers as they concern nuclear material accounting adjustments. 3) Calculations of inventory differences that result from processing operations and the impact to the Material Balance Report
Prerequisites: MCA-101DC Introduction to Nuclear Material Control and Accountability
MCA-101DE, Introduction to Nuclear Material Control & Accountability
MCA-110, Basics of Nuclear Material Accountability

MCA-114, Local Area Nuclear Material Accountability Software Administrator's Course

Delivery Method: Instructor Led Course
Length in Hours: 16
Description: This NTC-sponsored course provides a hands-on learning experience with the Local Area Nuclear Material Accountability Software (LANMAS) Administration Program. This course provides LANMAS, TID configurations, and setting up global parameters that are required to operate the LANMAS Administration Program. REQUIREMENT: Working knowledge of Microsoft Windows-based operating systems. RECOMMENDED: Microsoft SQL Server and completion of MCA-214 LANMAS Users course.
Audience: DOE and DOE-contractor personnel who are responsible for system administrator duties related to the LANMAS software.
Goals & Objectives: Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to use the LANMAS Administration Program to: 1) Define the “roles” used in LANMAS and provide an overview of the program. 2) Establish and revise site-specific parameters. 3) Establish and revise the security and access authorizations required within the application.
Prerequisites: MCA-101DE, Introduction to Nuclear Material Control & Accountability

MCA-120, Basics of Nuclear Material Control

Delivery Method: Instructor Led Course
Length in Hours: 20
Description: This beginner-level course describes the basic elements of materials control programs, including administrative controls, access controls, materials surveillance, materials containment, and detection/assessment mechanisms. Also presented are specific DOE materials control policy requirements and guidance for implementing these elements. The course includes exercises (requiring active participation) and written tests. Familiarity with DOE O 474.2 Admin Chg 2, Nuclear Material Control and Accountability.
Audience: DOE and DOE-contractor personnel who are responsible for developing, maintaining, and evaluating NMC programs; who perform NMC functions at a program level; and who provide oversight/assessment of NMC programs.
Goals & Objectives: Upon successful completion of the course, students will understand the following (as related to nuclear material control): 1) Source of requirements/policy/guidance. 2) Concepts of the actual requirements/policy/guidance. 3) Program element requirements and implementation. 4) Security/safeguards/safety interface. 5) Nuclear material control systems and hardware. 6) Detection and response procedures. 7) Compliance and performance assessments. 8) Identified training issues.
Prerequisites: MCA-101DE, Introduction to Nuclear Material Control & Accountability
MCA-101DC Introduction to Nuclear Material Control and Accountability

MCA-130, Statistical Concepts in Nuclear Material Control and Accountability

Delivery Method: Instructor Led Course
Length in Hours: 32
Description: Although few NMC&A professionals have substantial statistical backgrounds, statistical techniques play critical roles in many aspects of NMC&A. These roles range from basic functions (e.g., calibration) that are integral to most measurement systems to higher-level decision-making functions (e.g., assessment of the significance of inventory differences). Although most NMC&A professionals do not need statistical mastery, they do need to understand how statistical technology supports NMC&A, when statistical analysis is needed, and how to assess the results of statistical studies. Without formal training, these professionals may find it difficult to pick up the necessary statistical concepts and jargon on the job. Worse yet, they may misunderstand key ideas. This overview of NMC&A statistical applications is intended to provide nonstatisticians with a general understanding of how statistics are applied to NMC&A. The course develops statistical concepts without using mathematical derivations. Participants learn the applicable requirements for statistics as detailed in DOE O 474.2 Admin Chg 2, Nuclear Material Control and Accountability. The requirements are explained in nontechnical terms and illustrated with relevant NMC&A examples. Also addressed are applicable DOE guides. REQUIREMENTS: The ability to understand elementary algebraic concepts and graphical presentations of data in the form of bar charts, line graphs, and x-y charts. An understanding of the basics of the Normal Distribution and its parameters, including the Mean and the Standard Deviation, are necessary prerequisites for students taking this course. Knowledge of this material is assumed in the course materials.
Audience: DOE and DOE-contractors who have NMC&A responsibilities and need an understanding of basic statistical concepts, as they apply to NMC&A.
Goals & Objectives: Upon successful completion of this course, students will have knowledge of the following: 1) Statistical vocabulary sufficient to communicate effectively with statisticians and to understand technology and concepts in the NMC&A DOE orders, guidance, reports, standards and criteria, etc. 2) Application of several elementary statistical techniques and concepts such as "box plots," without concern for how the techniques are carried out in detail. 3) The manner in which statistical technology is applied to NMC&A problems, so participants can recognize situations that demand a statistician's skills. 4) The statistical techniques that apply to specific areas of NMC&A.
Prerequisites: MCA-101DE, Introduction to Nuclear Material Control & Accountability
MCA-101DC Introduction to Nuclear Material Control and Accountability

MCA-132, Sampling Plans for Nuclear Material Control and Accountability

Delivery Method: Instructor Led Course
Length in Hours: 24
Description: This course describes the knowledge and skills required to participate as a member of a team that writes and executes sampling plans for NMC&A. REQUIREMENTS: Basic familiarity with elementary algebra and the ability to operate a scientific calculator. EQUIPMENT: Each attendee must bring a scientific calculator. RECOMMENDED: Successful completion of MCA-130, Statistical Concepts in Nuclear Material Control and Accountability course, is strongly recommended. Familiarity with DOE O 474.2 Admin Chg 2, Nuclear Material Control and Accountability.
Audience: Experienced DOE and DOE-contractor personnel with NMC&A responsibilities performing NMC&A functions that require the use of statistical sampling plans.
Goals & Objectives: Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to 1) State the rationale and authority for sampling in NMC&A. 2) Define basic terms and compute elementary statistical measures dealing with populations and their parameters. 3) Define basic terms associated with a sample, and compute elementary sample statistics. 4) Describe a confidence interval for a population mean and proportion, and describe the meaning of the term "degree of confidence" related to these intervals. 5) Identify methods of sampling appropriate for a population. 6) Determine fundamental sampling considerations as they apply to NMC&A applications. 7) Write and execute a simple random sampling plan for an NMC&A problem.
Prerequisites: MCA-101DE, Introduction to Nuclear Material Control & Accountability
MCA-101DC Introduction to Nuclear Material Control and Accountability

MCA-150, Nuclear Material Control and Accountability Survey Procedures

Delivery Method: Instructor Led Course
Length in Hours: 32
Description: This course provides attendees with the knowledge and skills they need to function as team members during compliance and performance-based NMC&A surveys, audits, and assessments. It includes basic techniques for reviewing functional areas of the NMC&A Program. The course includes written tests and evaluated performance in team exercises. NOTE: As a reference aid, students should bring their copy of the student workbook from the prerequisite to this course, PHY-128DB Introduction to Basic Survey correspondence course. REQUIREMENTS: Familiarity with DOE O 470.4B Admin Chg 1, Safeguards and Security Program; DOE O 474.2 Admin Chg 2, Nuclear Material Control and Accountability; OA MC&A Inspector's Guide (latest version); and Protection and Control of Safeguards and Security Interests. RECOMMENDED: Strongly recommend successful prior completion of at least one of the following courses: MCA-110 Basics of Nuclear Material Accountability, or MCA-120 Basics of Nuclear Material Control.
Audience: DOE and DOE-contractor personnel (entry-level or newly assigned) who are responsible for conducting surveys, audits, internal reviews, or assessments of the NMC&A program at DOE facilities.
Goals & Objectives: Upon successful completion of the course, students will understand: 1) Purpose, regulations, responsibilities, and techniques for NMC&A inspections. 2) Distinction between a compliance approach and a performance approach when conducting surveys. 3) Compliance and performance approaches used during the survey of NMC&A program administration, accounting systems, nuclear material measurements and measurement-control programs, nuclear material inventory programs, and material-control programs. 4) Process of validating data and closing out the survey. 5) Process of analyzing the data and preparing a report with survey rating.
Prerequisites: MCA-101DE, Introduction to Nuclear Material Control & Accountability
MCA-101DC Introduction to Nuclear Material Control and Accountability

MCA-153, Introduction to Performance Testing for Nuclear Material Control and Accountability

Delivery Method: Instructor Led Course
Length in Hours: 32
Description: This course presents an overview of NMC&A components that can prevent, deter, or detect nuclear material losses (detection elements); and an overview of the process of planning, conducting, and evaluating performance tests of NMC&A components. Applicable department guides are also addressed. Early modules include written tests; the remainder of the course includes evaluated performance in team exercises. REQUIREMENTS: Familiarity with the MC&A Inspector's Guide (October 2009); DOE O 474.2 Admin Chg 2, Nuclear Material Control and Accountability; and DOE O 470.4B Admin Chg 1, Safeguards and Security Program.
Audience: DOE or DOE-contractor personnel who implement performance testing programs and conduct performance tests to validate vulnerability analyses, to demonstrate performance of NMC&A system elements, and to support audits and assessments.
Goals & Objectives: Upon successful completion of the course, students will understand 1) DOE policy, standards, and responsibilities for the conduct of NMC&A performance tests. 2) NMC&A detection elements and how to determine critical system elements. 3) Development of performance test plans and scenarios for the NMC&A program elements: Program Administration, Containment/Control, Accounting, Measurements/ Measurement Control, and Inventory. 4) Process for conducting tests, collecting the data and information, evaluating the information and drawing conclusions, identifying possible facility impacts, and reporting test results.
Prerequisites: MCA-101DE, Introduction to Nuclear Material Control & Accountability
MCA-101DC Introduction to Nuclear Material Control and Accountability

MCA-212, Nuclear Material Management and Safeguards System II (NMMSS II)

Delivery Method: Instructor Led Course
Length in Hours: 24
Description: This is an NTC-sponsored course conducted by NAC International, Inc., P.O. Box 922088, Norcross, GA 30092. To register or obtain further information, contact the NTC registrar at (505) 845-2250. This advanced-level training course (a follow-up to NMMSS I) addresses advanced topics and report products associated with nuclear materials accounting as they apply to NMMSS. REQUIREMENTS: Recent review of DOE O 474.2 Admin Chg 2, Nuclear Material Control and Accountability. Knowledge of the inventory and transaction-reporting procedures for attendees' respective facilities and the personnel responsible. EQUIPMENT: Scientific calculator and one copy of DOE O 474.2 Admin Chg 2.
Audience: DOE and DOE-contractor personnel who interact with the NMMSS as data suppliers, auditors, or users, and who have more than two years of experience.
Goals & Objectives: Upon successful completion of this course, students will understand: 1) Facility data-reporting issues, including Normal Operational Losses/Measured Discards and Accidental Losses (NOL/MD/AL), Dept. of Defense (DOD) and Mutual Defense (91C), calculating weight percent ranges applicability, and explanation of inventory differences. 2) Financial implications associated with the data. 3) How to interpret DOE reporting requirements. 4) Audit implications of data supplied to the system. 5) The annual reconciliation process. 6) Fiscal year project number conversion and monitoring.
Prerequisites: MCA-112, Nuclear Material Management and Safeguards System I (NMMSS I)

MCA-214, Local Area Nuclear Material Accountability Software

Delivery Method: Instructor Led Course
Length in Hours: 24
Description: This intermediate-level course provides a hands-on learning experience with the Local Area Nuclear Material Accountability Software (LANMAS). Each lesson addresses a single menu-bar heading, as well as all related functions on that heading's pull-down menu. Using computers, instructors demonstrate how to use each LANMAS function. Students then practice the same function (or series of functions) through one or more short activities or exercises throughout the instruction of the course to assure the learning objectives are being met. REQUIREMENTS: Working knowledge of the Microsoft Windows-based operating systems. RECOMMENDED: Recommended but not required are MCA-110, Basics of Nuclear Material Accountability; and MCA-112, Nuclear Material Management and Safeguards System I (NMMSS I) courses.
Audience: DOE and DOE-contractor personnel who are responsible for data input into LANMAS.
Goals & Objectives: Upon successful completion of this course, students will have hands-on experience using LANMAS software (latest version).
Prerequisites: MCA-101DE, Introduction to Nuclear Material Control & Accountability

MCA-224, Local Area Nuclear Material Accountability Software Advanced User's Course

Delivery Method: Instructor Led Course
Length in Hours: 24
Description: This advanced-level course provides a hands-on learning experience with the Local Area Nuclear Material Accountability Software (LANMAS). Each lesson addresses a single menu-bar heading, as well as all related functions on that heading's pull-down menu. Using computers, instructors demonstrate how to use each LANMAS function. Students then practice the same function (or series of functions) through one or more short activities or exercises throughout the instruction of the course to assure the learning objectives are being met. RECOMMENDED: Recommended but not required are MCA-110, Basics of Nuclear Material Accountability, and MCA-112, Nuclear Material Management and Safeguards System I (NMMSS I) courses.
Audience: DOE and DOE-contractor personnel who are responsible for data input into LANMAS.
Goals & Objectives: Upon successful completion of this course, students will have hands-on experience using LANMAS software (latest version).
Prerequisites: MCA-214, Local Area Nuclear Material Accountability Software

MCA-260, Physical Inventory for Nuclear Material Control and Accountability

Delivery Method: Instructor Led Course
Length in Hours: 24
Description: This course addresses the policy and process of conducting physical inventories of nuclear material. RECOMMENDED: Familiarity with DOE O 474.2 Admin Chg 2, Nuclear Material Control and Accountability.
Audience: DOE and DOE-contractor personnel who support nuclear material physical inventories. This includes NMC&A MBA custodians with oversight of nuclear material, and all other personnel involved in the inventory process.
Goals & Objectives: Upon successful completion of the course, students will: 1) Understand the purpose and policy for conducting physical inventories and identify the major steps. 2) Be able to identify the essential programmatic considerations in developing and documenting an inventory program. 3) Identify the essential steps in preparing for a physical inventory. 4) Identify the essential steps in conducting a physical inventory. 5) Identify the essential steps in the physical inventory reconciliation and reporting process.
Prerequisites: MCA-101DE, Introduction to Nuclear Material Control & Accountability
MCA-101DC Introduction to Nuclear Material Control and Accountability
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MIT - Management and Instructional Training Courses and Training

MIT-111, Basic Instructor Training

Delivery Method: Instructor Led Course
Length in Hours: 38
Description: This instructor certification course provides attendees with the basic tools necessary to conduct an effective training session. Attendance of this course fulfills the requirements for the NTC Instructor Certification program. It also fulfills the requirements for Protective Force personnel found in DOE order. NOTE: Attendees are expected to spend an average of two hours of their own time, each evening, preparing for class.
Audience: DOE Federal and contractor personnel who are delivering training.
Goals & Objectives: Upon successful completion of the course, students will: 1) Understand how to create an effective adult learning environment based on adult learning concepts. 2) Understand effective techniques for good instructional communication. 3) Understand how classroom atmosphere influences the learning process.4) Understand effective questioning techniques. 5) Have a basic awareness of instructional systems design (ISD) model phases. 6) Understand how to present and use goals and objectives effectively. 7) Understand the importance of lesson plans. 8) Understand how to use training aids. 9) Understand how adults learn and how an instructor can use or adapt instructional methods to facilitate learning. 10) Understand key issues related to student testing. 11) Understand the principles and techniques of teaching psychomotor skills. 12) Through presentation of an instructional lesson, apply teaching methods, use training aids, and administer a test.
Prerequisites: None

MIT-112DW, Distance Learning for Instructors

Delivery Method: Instructor Led Course
Length in Hours: 12
Description: THIS IS AN INSTRUCTOR-LED COURSE TAUGHT VIA WEBEX/INTERNET. This is a 12-hour course that is a supplement to MIT-111, Basic Instructor Training. The information is presented in a distance learning format to provide students with both academic and hands-on experience teaching within a distance learning environment. Students will participate in online group learning activities, deliver online training sessions (practice and formal evaluation), and observe the NTC process for distance learning in action. Each student will spend 4–6 hours outside of class, between Days 2 and 3, preparing a 15-minute lesson that they will present during the second week. The distance learning instructor will also serve as a model for the students as they participate in each learning session. Due to a variety of distance learning software programs, how to conduct student testing in a distance learning environment will not be addressed in this course.

Contact mit@ntc.doe.gov or registration@ntc.doe.gov for assistance with registration.
Audience: DOE Federal and contractor personnel who are delivering online training.
Goals & Objectives: See course descriptions for MIT-112DW, Days 1–4.
Prerequisites: MIT-111, Basic Instructor Training

MIT-112DW, Distance Learning for Instructors, Day 1

Delivery Method: Instructor Led Course
Length in Hours: 3
Description: THIS IS AN INSTRUCTOR-LED COURSE TAUGHT VIA WEBEX/INTERNET. This is Day 1 of a 12-hour course that is a supplement to MIT-111, Basic Instructor Training. In this introductory day, the student is introduced to the various roles and responsibilities of the facilitator and producer that are conducting training in the virtual classroom. In addition, they are provided three checklists for conducting online training and provide information on transitioning from the traditional classroom to the virtual classroom.

Contact mit@ntc.doe.gov or registration@ntc.doe.gov for assistance with registration.
Audience: DOE Federal and contractor personnel who are delivering online training.
Goals & Objectives: At the end of Day 1, the students will: 1) Understand the roles and responsibilities for both the Distance Learning facilitator and producer. 2) Use various communication techniques for delivering a training session in a virtual classroom.
Prerequisites: MIT-111, Basic Instructor Training

MIT-112DW, Distance Learning for Instructors, Day 2

Delivery Method: Instructor Led Course
Length in Hours: 3
Description: THIS IS AN INSTRUCTOR-LED COURSE TAUGHT VIA WEBEX/INTERNET. This is Day 2 of a 12-hour course that is a supplement to MIT-111, Basic Instructor Training. In this session, the student will create a session plan and supporting visual aids in preparation of delivering a training session on Days 3 and 4. In addition, they will use troubleshooting tools to identify and fix the most common problems encountered during online training.

Contact mit@ntc.doe.gov or registration@ntc.doe.gov for assistance with registration.
Audience: DOE Federal and contractor personnel who are delivering online training.
Goals & Objectives: At the end of Day 2, the students will: 1) Apply appropriate instructional techniques while planning, creating, delivering, and evaluating a distance learning session. 2) Create visual aids to support their session plan. 3) Use troubleshooting procedures to resolve any technical issues that arise during the session.
Prerequisites: MIT-111, Basic Instructor Training

MIT-112DW, Distance Learning for Instructors, Day 3

Delivery Method: Instructor Led Course
Length in Hours: 3
Description: THIS IS AN INSTRUCTOR-LED COURSE TAUGHT VIA WEBEX/INTERNET. This is Day 3 of a 12-hour course which is a supplement to MIT-111, Basic Instructor Training. In this session, the student will complete their session plan and supporting visual aids and practice delivering the training material in a virtual classroom. Also, they will have the opportunity to observe other students and provide constructive feedback on their peer's presentation. Contact mit@ntc.doe.gov or registration@ntc.doe.gov for assistance with registration.
Audience: DOE Federal and contractor personnel who are delivering online training.
Goals & Objectives: At the end of Day 3, the students will: 1) Apply appropriate techniques to engage and monitor student participation. 2) Practice delivering a distance learning presentation using the tools discussed throughout the course.
Prerequisites: MIT-111, Basic Instructor Training

MIT-112DW, Distance Learning for Instructors, Day 4

Delivery Method: Instructor Led Course
Length in Hours: 3
Description: THIS IS AN INSTRUCTOR-LED COURSE TAUGHT VIA WEBEX/INTERNET. This is Day 4 of a 12-hour course that is a supplement to MIT-111, Basic Instructor Training. During this session, the student will deliver a 15-minute training session using their session plan and supporting visual aids developed during Days 2 and 3. Also, they will have the opportunity to observe other. Contact mit@ntc.doe.gov or registration@ntc.doe.gov for assistance with registration.
Audience: DOE Federal and contractor personnel who are delivering online training.
Goals & Objectives: At the end of Day 4, the students will: 1) Apply appropriate instructional techniques to engage and monitor student participation. 2) Deliver a distance learning presentation using the tools discussed throughout the course. 3) Evaluate student performance. 4) Troubleshoot and resolve any technical issues that occur during their session.
Prerequisites: MIT-111, Basic Instructor Training

MIT-113DL, Distance Learning for Instructors, Video Teleconference (VTC)

Delivery Method: Instructor Led Course
Length in Hours: 8
Description: THIS IS AN INSTRUCTOR LED COURSE VIA VIDEO TELECONFERENCE. This is an 8-hour course that is a supplement to MIT-111, Basic Instructor Training, split into two 4-hour days. This course provides experienced instructors with training on how to teach within a distance learning environment where they will provide instructor-led training remotely.
The first day of training will cover the difference between teaching in person and remotely. It will also discuss the limitations of instructor movement, gestures, and student interaction when teaching in this environment. It will discuss guidelines for setting up the remote classroom and use video to discuss examples of good and bad practices during real training courses. It will also discuss best practices for managing student activity in the remote classroom. Students are expected to spend 1–3 hours outside of class between Day 1 and Day 2 to prepare for their Day 2 presentations.
The second day of training, using a lesson provided for them, student-instructors will present a 15-minute lesson on camera. They will be evaluated by the course instructor, who will provide them with recommendations on how to make the transition to the virtual learning environment.

It is recommended that students taking this course have at least 40 hours of classroom (live or virtual) teaching experience.

Contact Elaine Brown (ebrown@ntc.doe.gov) for information about room setup and technology/equipment requirements.
Audience: DOE Federal and contractor personnel responsible for conducting online training who possess at least 40 hours of classroom teaching experience.
Goals & Objectives: The student-instructor will be able to teach a class remotely in a video teleconference environment. 1) Teaching in a remote environment. 2) Interacting with students in a remote environment. 3) Best practices. 4) Teaching a lesson—Practical application.
Prerequisites: MIT-111, Basic Instructor Training

MIT-119DB, Introduction to Job Analysis

Delivery Method: eLearning
Length in Hours: 4
Description: This course is available as a PDF download in the NTC's Learning Management System. Please launch the course contents, download, print, and complete the course per instructions. This self-directed, entry-level eLearning course provides basic knowledge about the nature, process, and purposes of job analyses (JAs).
Audience: DOE, DOE-contractor, and other government personnel whose work requires involvement with JAs, whether as managers, practitioners, or users, and who have little or no knowledge of the JA process.
Goals & Objectives: Upon successful completion of this course, students will have a basic understanding of: 1) JA terminology 2) How analysis fits into the Instructional Systems Design process 3) Benefits of JAs 4) Fundamental JA techniques 5) How to plan for a JA 6) JA products
Prerequisites: None

MIT-120, Job Analysis

Delivery Method: Instructor Led Course
Length in Hours: 38
Description: This intense one-week course provides the basic knowledge and skills needed to complete a job analysis (JA) at the students’ respective sites. The course focuses on JA terminology and procedures, takes students through the steps required to develop a job analysis, and culminates with the development of job analysis and job task analysis reports. Students will work in groups throughout the course to complete the JA process using occupational descriptions provided by the NTC. NOTE: Students may work on site-specific job analysis projects with prior approval from the course lead instructor.
Audience: DOE Federal and contractor training, management, job analysts, and HR professionals whose work requires involvement with job analyses and their associated products, whether as managers, practitioners, or users.
Goals & Objectives: Upon successful completion of the course, students will: 1) Understand various aspects of the JA process. 2) Understand required actions prior to starting a JA. 3) Understand requirements for writing a task statement. 4) Understand data collection techniques used in conducting a JA. 5) Construct a valid task inventory for use in the JA process. 6) Understand how to administer a JA survey. 7) Understand how to analyze data obtained during the JA process. 8) Understand the steps necessary for presenting technical information relevant to a JA. 9) Understand the steps to follow when conducting a table-top analysis. 10) Understand the procedures for accomplishing a job task analysis. 11) Understand the use of a task-to-training matrix.
Prerequisites: MIT-119DB, Introduction to Job Analysis
MIT-209DE Introduction to Instructional Systems Design

MIT-121DE, EMETL Overview

Delivery Method: eLearning
Length in Hours: 1.5
Description: The goal of this eLearning course is familiarize managers, non-SMEs, and Federal oversight members with the Enterprise Mission Essential Task List (EMETL) program. Lesson topics include: EMETL basics, tasks, field manual, performance assurance, process, and roles. This course takes approximately 1 to 1-1/2 hours to complete.
Audience: DOE and DOE-contractor personnel
Goals & Objectives: The goal of this eLearning course is familiarize managers, non-SMEs, and Federal oversight members with the Enterprise Mission Essential Task List (EMETL) program.
Prerequisites: None

MIT-209DE, Introduction to Instructional Systems Design

Delivery Method: eLearning
Length in Hours: 2.5
Description: This entry-level course provides a basic understanding of the instructional design (ID) model, focusing on ISD as a process that can lead to the development of effective training.
Audience: DOE, DOE-contractor, and other government personnel who are responsible for conducting curriculum development and training.
Goals & Objectives: Upon successful completion of this course, students will have an understanding of: 1) The purpose of ID. 2) The phases used to describe each step of the ID process. 3) The relationships between each phase. 4) An instructional design model, which consists of five phases: analysis, design, development, implementation, and evaluation.
Prerequisites: None

MIT-210, Curriculum Development Training

Delivery Method: Instructor Led Course
Length in Hours: 37
Description: This intermediate-level course provides attendees with the tools necessary to develop effective instruction. Specifically patterned after the instructional design (ID) model, this hands-on course covers both the theory and practice of curriculum design and development. Topics include: coordination of the training analysis document, instructional objectives, student evaluation instruments, and lesson content and the principles of evaluating instruction for continual course improvement.
RECOMMENDED: Students may bring a relevant course or lesson from their site to revise or develop, and the associated analysis document(s) and design memos from their site. In addition to the course prerequisites, successful completion of MIT-120, Job Analysis, is strongly recommended.
Audience: DOE, DOE-contractor, and other government personnel who are responsible for conducting curriculum development and senior trainers who assist with curriculum revisions.
Goals & Objectives: Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to do the following: 1) Describe how the five ID phases relate to each other. 2) Using a training analysis document, write a coordinated course design document. 3) Describe key components of the Accelerated Learning design model. 4) Create or revise an effective two-hour block of instruction. 5) Describe how the principles of instructional evaluation contribute to course improvement.
Prerequisites: MIT-119DB, Introduction to Job Analysis
MIT-209DE Introduction to Instructional Systems Design

PPM-112DB, On the Job Trainers (OJT)

Delivery Method: eLearning
Length in Hours: 16
Description: NEW FEATURE: This course is now available as a .pdf download in the NTC LMS. Please launch the course contents, download, print, and complete course per instructions. This entry-level course is designed to develop competent on-the-job trainers (OJT) by addressing both general and site-specific OJT knowledge and skills. The course includes an overview of OJT, steps in the OJT process, site-specific procedures, and information about how to master the OJT process. The course consists of two components: a standardized component and a site-specific component. The standardized component includes information that is basic for any OJT. The site-specific component, which presents necessary information about local OJT programs, must be developed by individual sites and inserted electronically and in hardcopy into the student workbook. Sites accomplish this by requesting the electronic version of the course from the NTC course manager, then augmenting this document with site-specific materials. Upon completion of this process, this becomes a site-administered course, with all course responsibilities transferred to the site. Student must pass with 80% or better.
Audience: DOE and DOE-contractor personnel who need On-the-Job Trainer skills.
Goals & Objectives: Upon successful completion of the course material, participants will be able to state the following: 1) The purpose, training process, and key concepts of OJT. 2) The various elements that constitute an OJT program. 3) The philosophy and concepts of the OJT process as applied at participants' sites. 4) How to use the OJT process effectively to train site personnel.
Prerequisites: None
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PER - Personnel Security Courses and Training

PER-098, Personnel Security Processing

Delivery Method: Instructor Led Course
Length in Hours: 16
Description: PER-098 Personnel Security Processing This beginner-level course provides the basic foundation for knowledge and skill training in the DOE security clearance process. Students will receive training in the overall DOE Personnel Security Program as it relates to DOE Order 472.2, Personnel Security and Title 10 Code of Federal Regulations, Part 710 (10 CFR 710), Criteria and Procedures for Determining Eligibility for Access to Classified Matter or Special Nuclear Material. Students will learn to process upgrades, downgrades, terminations, transfers, and reinstates.
Audience: Newly assigned personnel (both DOE and DOE-contractor) with duties as a Personnel Security Specialist who are responsible for initial and subsequent DOE security clearance processing functions.
Goals & Objectives: Upon successful completion of this course, students will understand: 1) The purpose of the DOE Personnel Security Program. 2) The purpose of the Personnel Security File and the forms used to process a security clearance. 3) The purpose of the Central Personnel Clearance Index (CPCI) and the Questionnaire for National Security Positions (SF-86). 4) The process for establishing an initial security clearance (also with the reciprocity process). 5) The reinvestigation process (and recognize the method for processing clearance actions to include extensions, terminations, reinstatements, an upgrade, and downgrading of a security clearance). 6) The requirements for processing a Data Report on Spouse form and a Name Change request. 7) The requirements and procedures associated with initiating the security clearance process to include any subsequent clearance actions.
Prerequisites: None

PER-098DW, Personnel Security Processing

Delivery Method: Instructor Led Course
Length in Hours: 24
Description: THIS IS AN INSTRUCTOR LED COURSE VIA WEBEX/INTERNET TAUGHT OVER THREE DAYS This beginner-level course provides the basic foundation for knowledge and skill training in the DOE security clearance process. Students will receive training in the overall DOE Personnel Security Program as it relates to DOE Order 472.2, Personnel Security and Title 10 Code of Federal Regulations, Part 710 (10 CFR 710), Criteria and Procedures for Determining Eligibility for Access to Classified Matter or Special Nuclear Material. Students will learn to process upgrades, downgrades, terminations, transfers, and reinstates. course length 1920. Prior to taking this course, students are required to complete GEN-101DW to ensure system compatibility. Enrollment is available at https://lms.ntc.doe.gov/u/default.aspx.
Audience: Newly assigned personnel (both DOE and DOE-contractor) with duties as a Personnel Security Specialist who are responsible for initial and subsequent DOE security clearance processing functions.
Goals & Objectives: THIS IS AN INSTRUCTOR LED COURSE VIA WEBEX/INTERNET TAUGHT OVER THREE DAYS Upon successful completion of this course, students will understand: 1) The purpose of the DOE Personnel Security Program. 2) The purpose of the Personnel Security File and the forms used to process a security clearance. 3) The purpose of the Central Personnel Clearance Index (CPCI) and the Questionnaire for National Security Positions (SF-86). 4) The process for establishing an initial security clearance (also with the reciprocity process). 5) The reinvestigation process (and recognize the method for processing clearance actions to include extensions, terminations, reinstatements, an upgrade, and downgrading of a security clearance). 6) The requirements for processing a Data Report on Spouse form and a Name Change request. 7) The requirements and procedures associated with initiating the security clearance process to include any subsequent clearance actions.
Prerequisites: None

PER-098DW, Personnel Security Processing - Exam

Delivery Method: eLearning
Length in Hours: 0.5
Description: This exam is taken during the PER-098DW course. Students will be enrolled by the course Producer.
Audience:
Goals & Objectives:
Prerequisites: None

PER-099DE, Personnel Security Awareness Briefing for Key Officials

Delivery Method: eLearning
Length in Hours: 0.5
Description: This beginner-level briefing provides an overview of the roles and responsibilities of the DOE Personnel Security Program, and was developed for all key officials involved in the personnel security process.
Audience: Personnel security program key officials (managers, hearing officers, DOE-sponsored psychiatrists, HR officials, and human reliability certifying officials) involved in the decision-making process affecting an individual's eligibility for a clearance.
Goals & Objectives: Upon successful completion of this briefing, students will be familiar with: 1) The history, purpose, and general concepts associated with the DOE Personnel Security Program. 2) The DOE Criteria and Adjudicative Guidelines used to determine an individual's eligibility for a security clearance. 3) The basic elements of the adjudication process and the roles and responsibilities of key officials involved. 4) The administrative review process and the roles and responsibilities of key officials involved.
Prerequisites: None

PER-100DE, Introduction to DOE Personnel Security

Delivery Method: eLearning
Length in Hours: 3
Description: This beginner-level eLearning course provides a broad overview of the DOE Personnel Security Program. Topics include a program history; the roles and responsibilities of a personnel security program specialist/analyst; an introduction to applicable criteria and procedures as specified in Title 10, Code of Federal Regulations, Part 710 (10 CFR 710); and an overview of the DOE Administrative Review process. This eLearning course contains all of the Introduction to National Security Adjudication elements of the 2012 National Security Adjudicator Training Standards. Training performance is assessed by using problem solving exercises and quizzes.
Audience: DOE and DOE-contractor personnel newly assigned to perform duties within the DOE Personnel Security Program.
Goals & Objectives: Upon successful completion of this course, students will: 1) Be familiar with the history of the DOE Personnel Security Program. 2) Know the basic roles and responsibilities of a personnel security specialist/analyst. 3) Understand the criteria and procedures specified in 10 CFR 710. 4) Recognize the major elements of the DOE Administrative Review process.
Prerequisites: None

PER-101, Personnel Security Specialist Adjudication Training

Delivery Method: Instructor Led Course
Length in Hours: 24
Description: This intermediate-level course provides the basic foundation for knowledge and skill training in the DOE security clearance process. Attendees will receive training in the overall DOE Personnel Security Program as it relates to DOE Order 472.2, Personnel Security, and Title 10 Code of Federal Regulations, Part 710 (10 CFR 710), Criteria and Procedures for Determining Eligibility for Access to Classified Matter or Special Nuclear Material. Students will learn to analyze a case and evaluate factors that lead to an adjudicative decision on individual eligibility for DOE security clearance. REQUIREMENT: Current performance of duties as a Federal employee or contractor in the DOE Personnel Security Program.
Audience: Newly assigned personnel (both DOE and DOE-contractor) with duties as a Personnel Security Specialist who are responsible for initial and subsequent DOE security clearance processing and adjudication.
Goals & Objectives: Upon successful completion of this course, students will: 1) Be familiar with the DOE Personnel Security File. 2) Understand the variety of administrative and adjudicative documents contained within the DOE Personnel Security File. 3) Understand the types of background investigations used to determine eligibility for DOE access authorization. 4) Understand agency information associated with a background investigation. 5) Understand the DOE criteria and adjudicative guidelines used for determining eligibility for an access authorization. 6) Understand the purpose and the process associated with screening a Report of Investigation. 7) Understand the analysis and adjudicative guidelines associated with determining eligibility for DOE access authorizations. 8) Understand the additional actions employed in the DOE adjudication. 9) Understand the purpose of the case summary and be able to prepare one. 10) Understand the purpose, requirements, and procedures associated with the DOE personnel security interview.
Prerequisites: PER-100DE, Introduction to DOE Personnel Security

PER-110DE, Human Reliability Program (HRP) Overview

Delivery Method: eLearning
Length in Hours: 2.5
Description: This beginner-level course presents a basic overview of the DOE Human Reliability Program (HRP). Topics include a summary of the HRP as applicable to candidates, incumbents, supervisors, HRP officials, and HRP medical professionals. Students will receive training in the overall DOE HRP program as it relates to Title 10, Code of Federal Regulations, Part 712 (10 CFR 712). Additionally, the course incorporates the role of Personnel Security and the medical assessment portion of the HRP, along with clarifying the process for testing, removals, and transfers within the program.
Audience: DOE and DOE-contractor personnel
Goals & Objectives: Upon successful completion of this course, students will: 1) Be familiar with the Human Reliability Program. 2) Understand the roles and responsibilities of each individual involved with the program. 3) Understand drug and alcohol testing requirements. 4) Understand the medical assessment process. 5) Understand the role of personnel security. 6) Understand removals and transfers within the program. 7) Understand the due process given to employees that are either HRP candidates or HRP certified.
Prerequisites: None

PER-120DE, Roles and Responsibilities for Key HRP Officials

Delivery Method: eLearning
Length in Hours: 1
Description: This course content helps define and describe the roles and responsibilities for Key HRP Officials within the Human Reliability Program (HRP). Both the Department of Energy (DOE) and the nation have a compelling interest to ensure that individuals in positions that afford access to certain materials, nuclear explosive devices, facilities, and programs meet the highest standards of reliability and physical and mental suitability. The Human Reliability Program (HRP) helps to safeguard personnel, information, and operations at DOE facilities through a continuous evaluation process. This continuous observation and awareness process is in place to help us, as HRP Key Personnel, identify candidates/incumbents who may pose safety, security or reliability concerns.
Audience:
Goals & Objectives:
Prerequisites: None

PER-140DE, Unusual Behavior

Delivery Method: eLearning
Length in Hours: 1
Description: This beginner-level eLearning course provides the basic foundation for knowledge and skill training needed to observe, identify, and report unusual behavior.
Audience: DOE and DOE-contractor cleared and uncleared personnel
Goals & Objectives: By the end of the course, learners will meet the following objectives: 1) Be aware of usual, everyday behavior. 2) Observe behavior objectively. 3) Identify immediate safety and security concerns. 4) Identify changes in behavior. 5) Evaluate the importance of particular unusual behaviors. 6) Overcome concerns about reporting unusual behavior. 7) Report unusual behavior confidentially and without bias.
Prerequisites: None

PER-203, Advanced Personnel Security Adjudication and Interviewing

Delivery Method: Instructor Led Course
Length in Hours: 24
Description: This course provides advanced training in analyzing complex personnel security issues as they relate to determining eligibly for DOE access authorization. Attendees will receive training in the DOE Personnel Security Program as it relates to the DOE Order 472.2, Personnel Security. The course includes discussion of select issues of concern throughout the personnel security arena with emphasis on the adjudicative guidelines and criteria in Title 10 Code of Federal Regulations, Part 710 (10 CFR 710), Criteria and Procedures for Determining Eligibility for Access to Classified Matter or Special Nuclear Material. Additionally, through lecture and practical exercises, the course covers in detail the personnel security interview process with emphasis on enhancing the techniques and skills appropriate for use in resolving concerns about derogatory information.
Audience: DOE and DOE-contractor employee personnel security specialists who have experience in adjudicating personnel security cases and conducting personnel security interviews.
Goals & Objectives: Upon successful completion of this course, students will: 1) Understand the process of analyzing derogatory, disqualifying, and mitigating information as it pertains to security clearances. 2) Recognize the procedures associated with conducting a Personnel Security Interview (PSI). 3) Understand the components of the Statement of Security Concern (SOC). 4) Demonstrate how to conduct PSI, prepare a case summary, and an SOC.
Prerequisites: PER-101, Personnel Security Specialist Adjudication Training

PER-300, Administrative Review Hearing Procedures

Delivery Method: Instructor Led Course
Length in Hours: 16
Description: This advanced-level course provides students with a comprehensive understanding of the DOE administrative review (AR) hearing process as specified in Title 10, Code of Federal Regulations, Part 710 (10 CFR 710), Criteria and Procedures for Determining Eligibility for Access to Classified Matter or Special Nuclear Material. Through a series of in-class exercises, students gain a degree of practical experience in successfully preparing for and participating in a DOE AR hearing.
Audience: DOE and DOE-contractor employee with extensive experience within the DOE Personnel Security Program as a DOE personnel security specialist.
Goals & Objectives: Upon successful completion of this course, students will: 1) Be familiar with the role Office of General Counsel plays in the AR process and hearing procedures. 2) Be familiar with preparing a Notification Letter from an interview transcript. 3) Be familiar with the role of Office of Hearings and Appeals and observe a mock hearing. 4) Be familiar with the concepts involved in determining the types of evidence used in preparing for an AR hearing. 5) Understand the importance of presenting appropriate testimony during an AR hearing.
Prerequisites: PER-203, Advanced Personnel Security Adjudication and Interviewing
PER-200 Advanced Personnel Security Training

PER-302, Survey of PERSEC

Delivery Method: Instructor Led Course
Length in Hours: 24
Description: This advanced-level course prepares students to participate and assist members of designated Personnel Security survey or self-assessment teams. The course includes instruction on the survey process (planning, conduct, and post-survey activities) and skills training (performance test planning, interview techniques, and report writing).
Audience: DOE and DOE-contractor employee personnel who have experience in the Personnel Security Program.
Goals & Objectives: Upon successful completion of this course, students will: 1) Be familiar with the survey process. 2) Understand the planning and preparing for a survey. 3) Understand the process for surveying the following: Personnel Security Program, Safeguard and Security Awareness Program, the Human Reliability Program, and the Control of Classified Visits Program. 4) Understand post-survey procedures.
Prerequisites: PHY-130, Basic Survey
PER-100DE, Introduction to DOE Personnel Security

PER-310DE, Personnel Security Annual Refresher Training--FY 2012

Delivery Method: eLearning
Length in Hours: 2
Description: This eLearning course satisfies, in part, professional education requirements for Personnel Security Specialists within DOE, and serves as annual mandatory training to update and refresh personnel on policies and procedures. The course is written at a level that assumes Personnel Security Specialists have taken and are familiar with the content of the following four courses: PER-100DE, Introduction to DOE Personnel Security; PER-101, Personnel Security Specialist Adjudication Training; PER-203, Interviewing and Advanced AdjudicationAdvanced Personnel Security Adjudication and Interviewing; and PER-300, Administrative Review Hearing Procedures. Topics include a review of Personnel Security basics, an overview of the Counterintelligence Program, security concerns related to Counterintelligence, and the Insider Threat.
Audience: DOE and DOE-contractor personnel serving as Personnel Security Specialists
Goals & Objectives: Upon successful completion of this course, students will have a complete overview of the following concepts within the Personnel Security Program: 1) Personnel Security program basics. 2) An overview of the Counterintelligence Program. 3) Security concerns related to Counterintelligence. 4) The Insider Threat.
Prerequisites: None

PER-310DE, Personnel Security Annual Refresher Training--FY 2013

Delivery Method: eLearning
Length in Hours: 1
Description: This eLearning course satisfies, in part, professional education requirements for Personnel Security Specialists within DOE, and serves as annual mandatory training to update and refresh personnel on policies and procedures. The course is written at a level that assumes Personnel Security Specialists have taken and are familiar with the content of the following four courses: PER-100DE, Introduction to DOE Personnel Security; PER-101, Personnel Security Specialist Adjudication Training; PER-203, Interviewing and Advanced Adjudication, Advanced Personnel Security Adjudication and Interviewing; and PER-300, Administrative Review Hearing Procedures. Topics include a review of Personnel Security basics and Adjudicative Guideline F: Financial Considerations.
Audience: DOE and DOE-contractor personnel serving as Personnel Security Specialists
Goals & Objectives: The goal of the course is to refresh Personnel Security basics and review Adjudicative Guideline F: Financial Considerations.
Prerequisites: None

PER-310DE, Personnel Security Annual Refresher Training--FY 2014

Delivery Method: eLearning
Length in Hours: 1
Description: This eLearning course satisfies, in part, professional education requirements for Personnel Security Specialists within DOE, and serves as annual mandatory training to update and refresh personnel on policies and procedures. The course also contains the gap mitigation training necessary for incumbents to meet all of the elements of the 2012 National Security Adjudicator Training Standards. Training performance was assessed using problem solving exercises and quizzes. The course is written at a level that assumes Personnel Security Specialists have taken and are familiar with the content of the following four courses: PER-100DE, Introduction to DOE Personnel Security; PER-101, Personnel Security Specialist Adjudication Training; PER-203, Interviewing and Advanced Adjudication, Advanced Personnel Security Adjudication and Interviewing; and PER-300, Administrative Review Hearing Procedures. Topics include a review of Personnel Security basics and Adjudicative Guideline E: Personal Conduct.
Audience: DOE and DOE-contractor personnel serving as Personnel Security Specialists
Goals & Objectives: Goals & Objectives: Upon successful completion of this course, students will have a complete overview of the following concepts within the Personnel Security Program: 1) Gap mitigation training for elements of the 2012 National Security Adjudicator Training Standards. 2) Personnel Security program basics. 3) An overview of Adjudicative Guideline E: Personal Conduct. 4) Identify red flags during the Personnel Security Interview. 5) Recognize the importance of the use of follow up questions during the Personnel Security Interview.
Prerequisites: None
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PFT - Protective Force Training Courses and Training

ASTW01 Active Shooter Training Workshop

Delivery Method: Instructor Led Course
Length in Hours:
Description: This training workshop will be based on real-world threats and real-time issues. It will combine a variety of guest lecturers with hands-on practical exercises using both live fire and engagement simulation systems weapons. The exercises will be led by NTC instructors at the NTC’s Live Fire Range. Sites are encouraged to send instructors and protective force personnel responsible for active shooter response. The workshop will be held at the NTC in Albuquerque, New Mexico on June 3–5, 2014, and will conclude with a closeout session on Thursday, June 5. On Tuesday, June 3, presentations by several guest lecturers will be conducted at the NTC main campus. On June 4–5, Protective Force drills will be conducted at the NTC Live Fire Range (LFR) and Integrated Safety and Security Training and Evaluation Complex (ISSTEC).
Audience:
Goals & Objectives:
Prerequisites: None

LFR-102, Armorer Certification Course

Delivery Method: Instructor Led Course
Length in Hours: 80
Description: This intermediate-level course provides the knowledge necessary to maintain, repair, and function test standard DOE duty firearms. The Armorer Certification Program is a key part of the overall protective force mission. Armorer personnel are expected to have working-level knowledge of firearms routinely used at DOE sites. It includes a practical exercise for each firearm and written examinations, each requiring a minimum passing score of 80%. Upon successful completion of the course, students will be familiar with firearm characteristics, disassembly, reassembly, function testing, nomenclature, and the cycle of operation. NOTE: Students must complete required tests prior to enrollment in the course. Registrar will send tests to students to complete.
Audience: DOE and DOE-contractor personnel responsible for armorer duties.
Goals & Objectives: Upon successful completion of this course, students will do the following: 1) Identify firearms characteristics. 2) Perform disassembly/reassembly. 3) List function testing requirements. 4) Identify weapons nomenclature. 5) Perform the cycle of operations. 6) Demonstrate proper gauging and measurements.
Prerequisites: PFT-106DE, Firearms Safety

LFR-104, Armorer Recertification

Delivery Method: Instructor Led Course
Length in Hours: 8
Description: This certification process provides firearms performance testing and compliance with DOE Order 473.3. Armorers must have current factory certification for the firearms used for duty or contingency at their respective site. Recertification should be scheduled with the NTC Armory at least 3 months prior to the expiration date. The process itself usually takes 1 to 8 hours, depending on the number of armorers and weapon systems being taught.
Audience: Active DOE Armorers holding a current DOE Armorer Certification that is nearing the expiration date.
Goals & Objectives: Upon successful completion of this course, students will receive a certificate covering duty firearms for which they have received previous factory training.
Prerequisites: None

LFR-105, Armorer Certification Specialty Course

Delivery Method: Instructor Led Course
Length in Hours: 8
Description: This course will address the components, function, and repair of different weapon systems with each iteration. The content will change with each delivery based on specialized material for the specific weapon system(s) being taught, although the basic goal and objectives will remain the same. The students will have completed the Armorer Certification Course (LFR-102) prior to being allowed to enroll in any of the specialty offerings held at the NTC. NOTE: In-class hours may vary between 8 and 24 depending on the weapon system(s) being taught.
Audience: DOE and DOE-contractor personnel responsible for armorer duties.
Goals & Objectives: Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to: 1) Disassemble, inspect, and reassemble the weapon. 2) Perform a function check of the weapon. 3) Repair or adjust the weapon as necessary. 4) Identify the steps in the cycle of operations. 5) Name the functions of internal components. 6) Identify characteristics of the weapon.
Prerequisites: LFR-102, Armorer Certification Course

LFR-201DE, Live Fire Range Operations

Delivery Method: eLearning
Length in Hours: 3
Description: DOE O 473.3, Protection Program Operations, establishes the requirements for the management and operation of the protective force, including range operations and procedures. This introductory eLearning course provides the student with a comprehensive overview of the responsibilities involved in operating a DOE live fire range (LFR).
Audience: DOE and DOE-contractor personnel interested in LFR operations.
Goals & Objectives: Upon successful completion of this course, students will be familiar with LFR operations, including 1) an understanding of the armory, 2) familiarity with emergency services, 3) a grasp of steel target design and use 4) an understanding of firing range operations, 5) familiarity with training analysis and requirements, 6) a grasp of live fire shoot house operations, and 7) a comprehension of ammunition requirements.
Prerequisites: None

PFT-106DE, Firearms Safety

Delivery Method: eLearning
Length in Hours: 2
Description: This beginner level course is available online from the NTC's Learning Management System. You may launch and complete the course per course instructions. NOTE: You do not need to contact the NTC Registration Department to take this course. A completion will be automatically added to your Transcript. You should print a completion certificate from your Transcript and provide a copy to your training administrator or supervisor. This course covers general firearms safety. The course ends with a comprehensive final examination that requires a minimum passing score of 80%.
Audience: DOE and DOE-contractor personnel assigned to duties involving firearms.
Goals & Objectives: Upon successful completion of this course, students will have demonstrated their understanding of general firearms safety requirements.
Prerequisites: None

PFT-110, Basic Security Officer Training

Delivery Method: Instructor Led Course
Length in Hours: 38
Description: This introductory course provides standardized training for new security officers entering the DOE protective force community. Using scenario-based training methods, it addresses the knowledge and skills necessary to perform the duties of a security police officer. MEDICAL RELEASE: Site medical clearance forms MUST be on file with the NTC prior to attendance. DOE personnel must meet fitness standards as mandated in 10 CFR 1046. MANDATORY EQUIPMENT: Students must bring seasonal uniforms and seasonally-appropriate physical training gear. Mat/wrestling-type shoes are recommended. NOTE: Dependent upon class size, some training days may run longer than stated in course schedule.
Audience: DOE and DOE-contractor protective force personnel who are responsible for the safeguards and security of a DOE facility.
Goals & Objectives: Upon successful completion of this course, students will have: 1) Performed all order-required limited scope performance tests to a minimum passing score of 100%. 2) Demonstrated the core skills necessary to function within the DOE and contractor protective force environment.
Prerequisites: TRF-100D, Introduction to Protective Force

PFT-215, Basic Security Police Officer Training

Delivery Method: Instructor Led Course
Length in Hours: 260
Description: This introductory course is for new security police officers (SPOs) entering the DOE protective force community. Using scenario-based training methods, this course addresses the knowledge and skills necessary to perform the duties of an SPO. Topics include DOE-specific policies and procedures, legal requirements of the SPO and use of intermediate force, firearms training, post and patrol operations, and tactical operations. MEDICAL RELEASE: Site medical clearance forms MUST be on file with the NTC prior to attendance. DOE personnel must meet fitness standards as mandated in 10 CFR 1046. MANDATORY EQUIPMENT: Students must bring seasonal uniforms and outdoor gear plus duty equipment to include: protective mask and filter with carrying pouch, tactical flashlight, handcuffs, Nomex gloves, elbow and knee pads, billed cap or hat, boots that provide ankle support, groin protection and seasonally-appropriate physical training gear. NOTE: Dependent upon class size, some training days may run longer than stated in course schedule.
Audience: DOE and DOE-contractor protective force personnel who are responsible for the safeguards and security of a DOE facility.
Goals & Objectives: Upon successful completion of this course, students will have: 1) Performed all order-required limited scope performance tests to a minimum passing score of 100%. 2) Demonstrated the core skills necessary to function within the DOE and contractor protective force environment and to provide response and containment capabilities.
Prerequisites: TRF-100D, Introduction to Protective Force

PFT-307, Emergency Vehicle Operations Course

Delivery Method: Instructor Led Course
Length in Hours: 44
Description: This course provides training and certification in knowledge, skills, and abilities required to effectively provide emergency driving skills and pursuit operations within the Department of Energy (DOE) environment. The course consists of combined academic and practical applications with an emphasis on teaching key fundamental driving concepts and performance driving techniques. After the successful completion of this course, each student will be certified in DOE emergency vehicle operations driving and pursuit operations in accordance with DOE requirements. Students are required to possess a valid driver's license and be a candidate for conducting security police officer (SPO) duties. Prior to the course, students should be familiar with DOE O 473.3, Protection Program Operations; 10 CFR 1046, Physical Protection of Security Interests; PFT-215, Basic Security Police Officer Training; and Site specific Fresh Pursuit policies. MEDICAL RELEASE: Site medical clearance forms MUST be on file with the NTC prior to attendance. DOE personnel must meet fitness standards as mandated in 10 CFR 1046.
Audience: This course is designed for DOE and DOE contractor safeguards and security personnel responsible for conducting Security Police Officer (SPO) duties.
Goals & Objectives: Upon successful completion of this course students will demonstrate the core skills, knowledge, and abilities on key fundamental driving, performance driving, and pursuit operations in accordance with DOE requirements.
Prerequisites: TRF-100D, Introduction to Protective Force

PFT-308, Emergency Vehicle Operations Course Instructor Certification

Delivery Method: Instructor Led Course
Length in Hours: 44
Description: This course provides training and certification in knowledge, skills, and abilities required to effectively provide emergency driving skills and pursuit operations training within the DOE environment. The course consists of combined academic and practical applications with an emphasis on how to teach key fundamental driving concepts, performance driving techniques and set up appropriate driving courses at the instructors’ sites. After the successful completion of this course each student instructor will be certified to teach DOE EVOC driving and pursuit operations courses in accordance with their own sites. MEDICAL RELEASE: Site medical clearance forms MUST be on file with the NTC prior to attendance. DOE personnel must meet fitness standards as mandated in 10 CFR 1046. Requirements Students must Meet medical and fitness standards as mandated in 10 CFR 1046, if applicable, and/or site medical clearance forms must be on file with the NTC prior to attendance, Be site designated as DOE SPO Instructors, If a student instructor has not taken EVOC but has applied for equivalency, they must have a DOE NTC-certified EVOC instructor verify that they have completed a site specific EVOC, Student instructors must pass a driving and written pre-test prior to entry to the course. Recommendations Prior to the course, students should be familiar with the following: DOE O 473.3, Protection Program Operations, 10 CFR 1046, Physical Protection of Security Interests, PFT-215, Basic Security Police Officer Training curriculum, and Site specific Fresh Pursuit policies
Audience: This course is designed for DOE and DOE contractor safeguards and security personnel who will be assigned as EVOC instructors responsible for driver training at DOE/NNSA sites.
Goals & Objectives: Upon successful completion of this course students will demonstrate the core skills, knowledge, and abilities on key fundamental driving, performance driving, and pursuit operations in accordance with DOE requirements.
Prerequisites: PFT-307, Emergency Vehicle Operations Course
PFT-390DE, Engagement Simulation Systems
MIT-111, Basic Instructor Training

PFT-320, Precision Rifle/Forward Observer Training

Delivery Method: Instructor Led Course
Length in Hours: 80
Description: Site-specific conditions and protective force operations may justify requirements for protective force personnel to have qualifications for special skills such as precision rifle forward observer (PRFO) skills. This 10-day course provides students with the core skills necessary to join a DOE special response team (SRT) and operate as a PRFO. During the 80-hour course, students will learn and develop shooting skills with a precision rifle. Students will apply this training in live fire scenarios under day and night conditions. After successful completion of this training, students will be eligible for assignment to duty as a PRFO member of an SRT in accordance with the DOE requirements outlined in DOE O 473.3, Protection Program Operations. REQUIREMENTS: Successful qualification with all weapons reasonably expected to be used by a Security Police Officer (SPO) III on duty, on the applicable DOE firearms courses. Each candidate must be a site-designated SPO II and meet the DOE-mandated medical/fitness standards in 10 CFR 1046. SPO III candidates must meet DOE offensive standards mandated in 10 CFR 1046, and must provide site medical forms approving attendance. MANDATORY EQUIPMENT: Students must bring seasonal uniforms and outdoor gear plus duty equipment, including: elbow and knee pads, billed cap or hat, and boots that provide ankle support.
Audience: DOE and DOE-contractor safeguards and security personnel and other government personnel who are functioning or will function as PRFO members of SRTs.
Goals & Objectives: Upon successful completion of this course, students will demonstrate the core skills necessary to operate as a precision rifle/forward observer.
Prerequisites: TRF-100, Tactical Response Force I
PFT-215, Basic Security Police Officer Training
TRF-100D, Introduction to Protective Force

PFT-320A, Fieldcraft

Delivery Method: Instructor Led Course
Length in Hours: 40
Description: Using lecture and practical application, this course familiarizes students with techniques of camouflage, field movement, route selection, hide construction, hide selection, and shooting from a hide. All these techniques are taught from the perspective of a precision rifleman. MEDICAL RELEASE: Site medical clearance forms MUST be on file with the NTC prior to attendance. Personnel must meet physical standards as mandated in 10 CFR 1046. MANDATORY EQUIPMENT: Students must bring seasonal uniforms and outdoor gear plus duty equipment, including camouflage battle dress uniforms, camouflage booney hat, camouflage face paint, garnish material, gloves, elbow and knee pads, heavy subdued boots, and orange duct tape. OPTIONAL EQUIPMENT: Gillie suit, sniper smock, sniper veil, rifle support materials, and CamelBak-type container. NOTE: Dependent upon class size, some training days may run longer than stated in course schedule.
Audience: DOE and DOE-contractor personnel who are or will function as precision rifle forward observer members of special response force teams as outlined in DOE O 473.3.
Goals & Objectives: Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to demonstrate the core skills necessary to operate as a PRFOT member from a fieldcraft skill perspective.
Prerequisites: PFT-320, Precision Rifle/Forward Observer Training

PFT-321, Precision Rifle Forward Observer Training Instructor Certificate

Delivery Method: Instructor Led Course
Length in Hours: 80
Description: DOE O 473.3, Protection Program Operations, directs sites with protective force training and qualifications programs to develop and maintain instructors’ qualifications and the competencies needed to perform the tasks required of the protective force training mission. This course provides instructor-level training and meets the requirements for the identified instructors to accomplish this mission. Instructor candidates will learn methods for teaching the philosophy, operational techniques (marksmanship, observation, and crisis site information gathering/reporting skills), and procedural guidelines necessary for members of precision rifle forward observer teams. MEDICAL RELEASE: Site medical clearance forms MUST be on file with the NTC prior to attendance. Personnel must meet fitness standards as mandated in 10 CFR 1046. MANDATORY EQUIPMENT: Students must bring seasonal uniforms and outdoor gear plus duty equipment, including: elbow and knee pads, billed cap or hat, and boots that provide ankle support. NOTE: Dependent upon class size, some training days may run longer than stated in course schedule.
Audience: DOE and DOE-contractor protective force personnel who are designated to conduct firearms training at DOE sites.
Goals & Objectives: Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to demonstrate the core skills necessary to instruct the varied aspects of the PRFOT and to develop and implement training plans to meet site training requirements.
Prerequisites: MIT-111, Basic Instructor Training
PFT-320, Precision Rifle/Forward Observer Training
PFT-401, Firearms Instructor Certification

PFT-370, Opposition Force

Delivery Method: Instructor Led Course
Length in Hours: 40
Description: This scenario-based training provides students with the information they need to conduct, lead, and participate in "force-on-force" exercises as the opposition force, at the site level. Topical areas include: introduction to opposition force, pre-mission activities, mission activities, exterior and interior tactics, vehicle ambush, and ESS weapon systems. MEDICAL RELEASE: Site medical clearance forms MUST be on file with the NTC prior to attendance. DOE personnel must meet medical and fitness standards as mandated in 10 CFR 1046. MANDATORY EQUIPMENT: Students are required to bring duty uniforms, elbow and knee pads, boots that provide ankle support, groin protection, Nomex gloves and a load bearing vest. No site firearms are required for this course. NOTE: Dependent upon class size, some training days may run longer than stated in course schedule.
Audience: DOE and DOE-contractor protective force personnel who will be assigned duties as opposition force team members.
Goals & Objectives: Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to demonstrate skills and knowledge while performing as members of an opposition force team.
Prerequisites: PFT-215, Basic Security Police Officer Training

PFT-390DE, Engagement Simulation Systems

Delivery Method: eLearning
Length in Hours: 4
Description: This eLearning course provides DOE-approved techniques and methods for developing safe and effective Engagement Simulation Systems (ESS) activities. ESS is based on real-world weapons systems. DOE uses ESS to simulate different conditions in protective force performance tests as well as force-on-force and deadly force-related training situations.
Audience: Advanced/Experienced DOE Security Police Officer, Contractor Personnel and SPO Supervisory Management
Goals & Objectives: Students will understand DOE-approved techniques and methods for developing safe and effective Engagement Simulation Systems (ESS) activities. Objectives Students will identify the use of engagement simulation systems (ESS) for performance testing and training activities. Students will identify the DOE safety procedures and requirements for using ESS performance testing and training activities. Students will identify the different ESS firearms and equipment used by the DOE for performance testing and training activities. Students will identify controller roles and responsibilities in ESS performance testing and training activities. Students will identify the guidelines and techniques used in developing ESS activities.
Prerequisites: None

PFT-401, Firearms Instructor Certification

Delivery Method: Instructor Led Course
Length in Hours: 80
Description: This course provides instructor-level training and certification to Department of Energy (DOE) and DOE-contractor protective force personnel who are designated to conduct firearms training at DOE sites. DOE O 473.3 directs sites with protective force training and qualifications programs to develop and maintain instructors’ qualifications and the competencies needed to perform the tasks required of the protective force training mission. This course meets the requirements for the identified instructors to accomplish this mission. Instructor candidates will learn how to safely instruct new shooters in firearms handling and qualification courses of fire. This course addresses safety issues, detection and correction of shooter errors, range instruction, engagement simulations systems, and designing courses of fire. MEDICAL RELEASE: Site medical clearance forms MUST be on file with the NTC prior to attendance. DOE personnel must meet medical and fitness standards as mandated in 10 CFR 1046, if applicable, and/or site medical clearance forms must be on file with the NTC prior to attendance. NOTE: Prior to arrival, instructor candidates must submit to the NTC registration verification that they have fired a minimum 90% score on the qualification course of fire that they are currently trained to. To successfully complete this training, all instructor candidates must shoot a minimum score of 90% on the DOE Tactical Response Force Combined handgun and rifle qualification course of fire that will take place on the last day of the class. Instructor candidates will perform instructor candidate-directed classroom and range presentations, must pass Limited Scope Performance Tests at 100%, and must pass written tests at 80%. MANDATORY EQUIPMENT: Students must bring their site-issued duty uniforms and duty equipment, including the following: gun belt, holster, flashlight, firearms (optional), pistol and rifle, magazine pouches, knee and elbow pads, gloves (shooting), protective mask and filter with carrying pouch and billed cap. If NTC firearms are used, pre-coordination with the NTC is required.
Audience: DOE and DOE-contractor safeguards and security personnel responsible for firearms instruction at all DOE/NNSA sites
Goals & Objectives: Upon successful completion of this course, students will have the ability to: 1) Perform as an instructor in a classroom setting and as a lead instructor on the firing line. 2) Design individual courses of fire. 3) Demonstrate the core skills necessary to instruct new shooters in pistol and rifle manipulation.
Prerequisites: MIT-111, Basic Instructor Training

PFT-402, Advanced Weapons Systems Instructor Certification

Delivery Method: Instructor Led Course
Length in Hours: 40
Description: This “train the trainer” course provides a detailed understanding of standardized advanced firearms training and contemporary techniques for weapons instruction. The course develops skills necessary to conduct firearms training; it is not designed to develop advanced weapon systems shooting skills. This advanced level course will cover the major elements comprising the necessary knowledge and training for select advanced weapon systems within the Department of Energy (DOE). Current weapon modules include: M240 and M249 machine guns, with an introduction to the MK46 and MK48, and the M203 grenade launcher. The course addresses training safety issues, range instruction, qualification courses of fire, and the designing of courses of fire. Lecture is reinforced by a series of practical skill based activities designed to give the instructor candidates exposure to realistic application of methods and techniques of instruction and operational employment of the weapon systems. Through practical application and work with generic information that is typical of many DOE sites, instructor candidates will have the opportunity to practice and develop the skills presented in the lecture sections of the training. Activities follow a logical and progressive building block approach that introduces the weapon, methods of use, and integrated instructional skills scenarios. Instructional techniques employed in the course include: lectures to provide basic information, demonstrations to translate the lecture into action, individual activities to build the hands-on skills of each instructor candidate and small group discussions to help build on the learning through shared experiences. SPECIAL NOTE: It is recommended that candidates have at least six months of local advanced weapon systems experience and a current DOE qualification in the selected weapon.The NTC will provide all weapons necessary to complete the course. Students are required to have 100% attendance and participation. MEDICAL RELEASE: Site medical clearance forms MUST be on file with the NTC prior to attendance. DOE personnel must meet medical and fitness standards as mandated in 10 CFR 1046, and provide a copy of current semi-annual weapons qualification scores (including scores for: machine gun, and grenade launcher). MANDATORY EQUIPMENT: Students must bring seasonal uniforms and outdoor gear plus duty equipment to include: Nomex gloves, elbow and knee pads, billed cap or hat, and boots that provide ankle support. A large Leatherman or similar tool is recommended. NOTE: Dependent upon class size, some training days may run longer than stated in course schedule.
Audience: This course is targeted toward DOE and DOE-contractor safeguards and security personnel responsible for advanced weapons training.
Goals & Objectives: Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to: 1) Conduct advanced weapons training on specific firearms. 2) Operate each of the weapons that they will be certified to instruct. 3) Understand specific DOE requirements for the weapons they are qualified to teach.
Prerequisites: PFT-401, Firearms Instructor Certification
MIT-111, Basic Instructor Training

PFT-403, Intermediate Force Instructor Certification

Delivery Method: Instructor Led Course
Length in Hours: 80
Description: This course provides training and certification required to effectively instruct intermediate force skills and techniques to Department of Energy (DOE) and DOE-contractor safeguards and security Protective Force (PF). Orders direct sites with PF training and qualifications programs to develop and maintain, in an effective and efficient manner, the competencies needed by PF personnel to perform the tasks required to fulfill the PF mission. This course meets the requirement for the intermediate force instructor to accomplish this mission. After successful completion of this course, instructor candidates will be certified as Intermediate Force instructors in accordance with the DOE requirements outlined in DOE O 473.3. SPECIAL NOTE: This training includes workplace simulations and/or role playing exercises that may induce stress or emotional response in some participants. MEDICAL RELEASE: Site medical clearance forms MUST be on file with the NTC prior to attendance. DOE personnel must meet medical and fitness standards as mandated in 10 CFR 1046, if applicable, and/or site medical clearance forms must be on file with the NTC prior to attendance. MANDATORY EQUIPMENT: Students must bring physical-fitness uniform, mat shoes (i.e. wrestling shoes), duty belt with holster, handcuffs, baton, and a roll of athletic tape. NOTE: Dependent upon class size, some training days may run longer than stated in course schedule.
Audience: This course is designed for experienced DOE and DOE-contractor PF personnel who, upon successful completion of the course, will be assigned to the position of Intermediate Force instructor.
Goals & Objectives: Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to: 1) Demonstrate proficiency in defensive tactics training. 2) Demonstrate ability to effectively instruct standardized defensive tactics for SPOs in mandated training areas.
Prerequisites: MIT-111, Basic Instructor Training

PFT-405, Basic Tactical Entry

Delivery Method: Instructor Led Course
Length in Hours: 40
Description: This course covers the major elements necessary to train a Tactical Entry Specialist. It addresses selection, inspection, and proper manipulation of mechanical entry tools; identification and accomplishment of defeating barriers; target analysis in the review of target folders and intelligence prior to assault; communication; and breacher integration into the team. Lecture is reinforced by a series of practical skill-based activities designed to expose the student to realistic application of methods and techniques of employment. Activities follow a logical and progressive building-block approach that introduces the tools, methods of use, and integrated skill scenarios. Participants perform several graded (pass/fail) limited scope performance tests and take one written examination requiring a score of at least 80%. MEDICAL RELEASE: Site medical clearance forms MUST be on file with the NTC prior to attendance. DOE personnel must meet medical and fitness standards as mandated in 10 CFR 1046. MANDATORY EQUIPMENT: Students must bring: load bearing vest, knee and elbow pads, Nomex gloves, department-issued long-sleeve shirt and long pants (Nomex flight suit recommended), leather above-the-ankle boots, approved eye protection, Level-III body armor, tactical gear with helmet and chemical protective mask. NOTE: Dependent upon class size, some training days may run longer than stated in course schedule.
Audience: DOE and DOE-contractor personnel assigned to SRTs.
Goals & Objectives: Upon successful completion of this course, participants will: 1) Be able to employ a variety of mechanical and ballistic methods for tactical entry by SRTs. 2) Understand how to maintain tactical-entry equipment. 3) Be able to analyze targets to select and employ appropriate methods of forced entry during crisis resolution. 4) Understand the principles of safety as they apply to all phases of tactical entry.
Prerequisites: PFT-215, Basic Security Police Officer Training
TRF-100, Tactical Response Force I

PFT-406, Basic Tactical Entry Instructor Certification

Delivery Method: Instructor Led Course
Length in Hours: 40
Description: This course provides instructor-level training and certification for Tactical Entry Specialists. It addresses selection, inspection, and proper manipulation of mechanical, ballistic, and thermal breaching tools. Students will learn how to assemble a simple target folder and use it to complete a target analysis. They will also conduct classes requiring range set up, proper placement of props, and having all the proper personal protective equipment for student use. They will develop a night training exercise that will include the use of all breaching tools taught. This course includes a written exam with a minimum 80% score. MEDICAL RELEASE: Site medical clearance forms MUST be on file with the NTC prior to attendance. DOE personnel must meet medical and fitness standards as mandated in 10 CFR 1046. MANDATORY EQUIPMENT: Students must bring a load-bearing vest, knee and elbow pads, Nomex gloves, department-issued long-sleeve shirt and long pants (Nomex flight suit recommended), leather above-the-ankle boots, approved eye protection, site-issued body armor, and tactical gear with helmet. NOTE: Dependent upon class size, some training days may run longer than stated in course schedule.
Audience: DOE and DOE-contractor personnel assigned to special response teams or training departments or both.
Goals & Objectives: Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to: 1) Instruct students in the proper use of mechanical, ballistic, and thermal breaching. 2) Develop a target folder. 3) Understand the principles of safety as they apply to all phases of tactical entry. 4) Design a training exercise.
Prerequisites: MIT-111, Basic Instructor Training
PFT-405, Basic Tactical Entry

PFT-408, Ground Control Instructor Certification

Delivery Method: Instructor Led Course
Length in Hours: 36
Description: This course provides instructor-level training and certification in arrest and control defensive tactics. The course addresses takedowns, controlling suspects on the ground, position of advantage, escapes/reversals, and weapon retention techniques from the ground. The course Includes three graded exercises, a performance test requiring a score of 100%, an instruction exercise requiring a satisfactory rating in all categories, and a written examination requiring a score of at least 80%. MEDICAL RELEASE: Site medical clearance forms MUST be on file with the NTC prior to attendance. DOE personnel must meet medical and fitness standards as mandated in 10 CFR 1046. MANDATORY EQUIPMENT: Students must bring physical-fitness uniform with long pants (no short pants of any kind allowed). Knee pads and mat/wrestling-type shoes are recommended. NOTE: Dependent upon class size, some training days may run longer than stated in course schedule.
Audience: DOE and DOE-contractor trainers of protective force personnel.
Goals & Objectives: Upon successful completion of this course, students will have the ability to perform as ground control instructors qualified to conduct training for security personnel.
Prerequisites: MIT-111, Basic Instructor Training

PFT-421, Firearms Instructor Certification Update

Delivery Method: Instructor Led Course
Length in Hours: 24
Description: This course provides instructor-level professional development to DOE and DOE-contractor protective force personnel who have been previously certified to conduct firearms training at DOE sites. DOE O 473.3 directs that firearm instructor recertification requirements must be met, and this training event has been designed to meet the professional development portion of those requirements. Lecture, instructor-led discussions, and examples of proper task performance will provide background information and general principles for most topics. Lecture is reinforced by skill-building exercises and activities. Lessons will review safe and effective marksmanship instruction, manipulation with related tasks, and steel requirements. Safety issues, detection and correction of shooter errors, and range instruction will all be addressed. Exercises and activities will be conducted to ensure that each participant possesses a common knowledge base and skill set. Activities will include student-led live fire and dry fire exercises under the supervision of the lead and assistant instructors. Small group discussions and exercise debriefs will help build on the learning through shared experiences. MEDICAL RELEASE: Site medical clearance forms MUST be on file with the NTC prior to attendance. DOE personnel must meet the medical and fitness standards mandated in 10 CFR 1046. Prior to arrival, student instructors must submit to the NTC registration verification that within 30 days prior to course start date, they have qualified with at least a minimum score on the course of fire commensurate with the level of training provided: 1) 80 percent for Security Police Officer instructors, and 2) 90 percent for Special Response Team instructors.
Audience: DOE and DOE-contractor protective force personnel who have successfully completed PFT-401 Firearms Instructor Certification course.
Goals & Objectives: Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to demonstrate the ability to effectively conduct standardized instruction for firearms training.
Prerequisites: PFT-401, Firearms Instructor Certification

PFT-423, Intermediate Force Instructor Certification Update

Delivery Method: Instructor Led Course
Length in Hours: 16
Description: This course provides instructor-level professional development to DOE and DOE-contractor protective force personnel who have been previously certified to conduct intermediate force training at DOE sites. DOE O 473.3 directs that intermediate force instructor recertification requirements must be met, and this training event has been designed to meet the professional development portion of those requirements. Lecture, instructor-led discussions, and examples of proper task performance will provide background information and general principles for most topics. Lecture is reinforced by skill-building activities. Lessons will review movement, empty-hand blocking, takedowns and stabilizations, handcuffing techniques, weapon retention, and edged weapon defense. Activities will be conducted to ensure that each participant possesses a common knowledge base and skill set. Activities will include practice of the techniques taught under the supervision of the lead and assistant instructors. Small group discussions and activity debriefs will help build on the learning through shared experiences. MEDICAL RELEASE: Site medical clearance forms MUST be on file with the NTC prior to attendance. DOE personnel must meet the medical and fitness standards mandated in 10 CFR 1046.
Audience: DOE and DOE-contractor protective force personnel who have successfully completed PFT-403 Intermediate Force Instructor Certification course.
Goals & Objectives: Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to demonstrate the ability to effectively conduct standardized instruction for intermediate force training.
Prerequisites: PFT-403, Intermediate Force Instructor Certification

PFT-460, Tactical Leadership

Delivery Method: Instructor Led Course
Length in Hours: 76
Description: This course provides DOE and DOE-contractor protective force supervisors with the tactical leadership knowledge and skills they need to resolve critical incidents at a site or facility. The course is delivered through lecture and a variety of practical exercises. Topical areas include: Leadership Principles, Characteristic of a Leader, Knowledge and Leadership, Responsibilities of a Leader, Planning, Tactical Doctrine, Briefings, Critical Incident Management, Initial Response, Assault Executions, Post Assault, Stress Management, Dismounted and Mounted Movements and Precision Rifle Forward Observer as a resource. MEDICAL RELEASE: Site medical clearance forms MUST be on file with the NTC prior to attendance. DOE personnel must meet medical and fitness standards as mandated in 10 CFR 1046. Students will be required to pass a written test with a score of at least 80%. MANDATORY EQUIPMENT: Students must bring duty uniforms, billed cap, Nomex gloves, tactical vest, elbow and knee pads, eye protection, ear protection, and boots that provide ankle protection. NOTE: Dependent upon class size, some training days may run longer than stated in course schedule.
Audience: DOE and DOE-contractor protective force supervisors.
Goals & Objectives: Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: 1) Identify leadership characteristics, knowledge, and principles. 2) Demonstrate the ability to lead a small element in a combat situation. 3) Demonstrate the ability to manage a critical incident scene.
Prerequisites: PFT-215, Basic Security Police Officer Training
PFT-460DE, Introduction to Tactical Leadership

PFT-460DE, Introduction to Tactical Leadership

Delivery Method: eLearning
Length in Hours: 2.5
Description: This course provides DOE and DOE-contractor protective force supervisors with tactical leadership knowledge and skills. This is an e-Learning course delivered online. Topic areas include: Leadership in Principle, Characteristic of a Leader, Knowledge and Leadership, Responsibilities of a Leader, and Stress Management. The course is 2 to 2.5 hours in length and includes a test at the end of each lesson. Student must score 80% or higher on the test in order to pass the course.
Audience: DOE and DOE-contractor protective force supervisors.
Goals & Objectives: Goals: The student will: 1) Understand the concept of leadership. 2) Understand how individual beliefs, values, and norms affect leadership. 3) Understand what knowledge a leader should possess. 4) Understand what leaders must do to ensure that they are prepared to perform their duties successfully. 5) Have a basic understanding of factors associated with stress. Objectives: Identify four requirements that satisify leadership doctrine. Identify four factors of leadership. Identify two leadership styles. Identify three styles of leadership. Identify selected principles of leadership. Identify five checks of organizational leadership. Define "beliefs." Identify individual characteristics that all security police officers (SPOs) are expected to strive for or have. Define "norms." Identify two categories of norms. Identify elements of professional ethics. Identify what a leader should know. Identify the purpose of standards. Identify five considerations to bear in mind when preparing for a counseling session. Identify three identities of a leader. Define "human nature." Identify two categories of knowledge in which a leader must be proficient. Identify the three responsibilities of a leader. Identify the two ways in which a leader provides purpose. Identify selected ways in which a leader provides direction. Identify selected key points in establishing goals. Identify the problem solving process. Identify selected factors in how people learn. Identify selected benefits derived from training to standard. Identify ways to maintain subordinates' mental conditioning. Identify methods for conducting tactical training. Identify ways to assess training outcomes. Identify the definition of stress. Identify types of stress. Identify the phases of burnout. Identify the definition of stressor. Identify two types of stressors. Identify common signs of physical stress. Identify factors influencing reactions to stress.
Prerequisites: None

PFT-501, Live Fire Shoot House Instructor Certification

Delivery Method: Instructor Led Course
Length in Hours: 8
Description: This course provides instructor-level training and certification indicating that individuals are capable of full and safe performance as lead/control instructors in the Live Fire Shoot House (LFSH) at their sites. The process is as follows: After completing PFT-407, Security Police Officer III Instructor Certification or TRF-420, Tactical Response Force Instructor Certification, individuals serve as assistant LFSH instructors under the lead/control instructor at their site. This apprenticeship satisfies the 40-hour specification in DOE O 473.3, Protection Program Operations. The lead/control instructor must determine when the apprentice is capable of full and safe performance, and the apprentice must pass the written examination and LSPT at 100%. Instructors satisfying these requirements must formally request LFSH IC certificates from the NTC Director. Documents supporting completion of above requirements must also be provided at the time of the request. Certificates will not be issued for LFSH IC unless this supporting documentation is provided.
Audience: SRT instructors.
Goals & Objectives: Upon successful completion of the required 40-hour apprenticeship and LSPT, passing score of 100% on the exam, and the recommendation of their site with proper documentation, students will be awarded the Live Fire Shoot House Instructor Certificate.
Prerequisites: TRF-420, Tactical Response Force 2 Instructor Certification

TRF-100, Tactical Response Force I

Delivery Method: Instructor Led Course
Length in Hours: 300.5
Description: This course provides standard basic training for the DOE security police officer II (SPO II) position upon entry into the DOE protective force community. TRF-1 will support the primary mission of the DOE Protective Force by providing training in the individual and team tactical combat skills necessary to protect safeguards and security interests from an armed terrorist threat. The scope of the course includes training in the use of handguns and rifles; an overview of advanced weapons, intermediate force, and the DOE Force Continuum; field operations, recapture/recovery support operations; and defensive and emergency vehicle operations. Proficiency in these areas will be enhanced through situational training force-on-force exercises in support of initial classroom content delivery and firing range practice. MEDICAL RELEASE: Site medical clearance forms MUST be on file with the NTC prior to attendance. DOE personnel must meet medical and fitness standards as mandated in 10 CFR 1046. A valid driver's license is required for participation in the driving portion. MANDATORY EQUIPMENT: Students must bring duty equipment, firearms and physical training gear, gas mask, tactical flashlight and handcuffs, seasonal outdoor gear groin protection, Nomex gloves and mat shoes. NOTE: Dependent upon class size, some training days may run longer than stated in course schedule.
Audience: DOE and DOE-contractor protective force personnel who are responsible for the safeguards and security of a DOE facility.
Goals & Objectives: Upon successful completion of the course, students will have: 1) Performed the necessary duties and tasks to be certified at the SPO II level. 2) Passed performance-based and cognitive tests demonstrating the core skills required to effectively participate in response and containment operations within the DOE environment.
Prerequisites: TRF-100D, Introduction to Protective Force

TRF-100D, Introduction to Protective Force

Delivery Method: Instructor Led Course
Length in Hours: 40
Description: DOE sites that have protective force training and qualifications programs must develop and maintain the competencies needed by protective force personnel to fulfill the mission. The sites also must maintain these training/qualifications programs efficiently and effectively. This introductory course supports that effort through training that covers specific guidance in DOE orders. By exposing students to generic information that applies to many DOE sites, this course helps lay the groundwork for eventual application of site-specific requirements. After exploring the general knowledge and skills presented in the lecture sections of the training, students have an opportunity to relate them to their specific sites. This prerequisite-level course uses classroom lecture, activities, and discussion to introduce security police officer (SPO)-I and SPO-II personnel to general topics including the following: 1) The DOE Safeguards and Security Program 2) Biological, Radiological, and Chemical Hazards 3) Legal Issues 4) Post and Patrol Procedures 5) Communications 6) Physical Fitness and Its Benefits for SPOs
Audience: SPOs that wish to take more advanced courses such as Tactical Response Force (TRF) I, TRF II, and Basic Security Police Officer Training.
Goals & Objectives: Upon successful completion of this course, students will have accomplished the following: 1) Understanding DOE standard basic training for the SPO I level and DOE-specific functions. 2) Successfully passing a written test demonstrating mastery of the core skills required for effective participation in the subsequent TRF I training (which addresses response and containment operations within the DOE environment).
Prerequisites: None

TRF-200, Tactical Response Force II

Delivery Method: Instructor Led Course
Length in Hours: 200
Description: This intermediate-level course provides training and certification in skills and techniques required to effectively execute recapture/recovery and pursuit operations and to support interruption, interdiction, neutralization, containment, and denial strategies within the DOE environment as a member of a special response team (SRT). Students will develop close quarters marksmanship skills with handgun and rifle; close quarters battle techniques; mounted, dismounted, and urban movement techniques; a variety of assault options; and mechanical and ballistic breaching techniques. Skills are applied in live fire exercises and force-on-force scenarios under day and night conditions. Physical training occurs three days per week for the duration of the course. REQUIREMENTS: Students must, prior to attendance, successfully qualify on the Tactical Response Force Combined Handgun/Rifle Qualification Course with a minimum score of 90%, be site-designated security police officers (SPO) IIs, meet medical and fitness standards as mandated in 10 CFR 1046, and file medical clearance forms with the NTC. MANDATORY EQUIPMENT: Students must bring firearms and a duty training uniform (long sleeves required) appropriate to the season; boots providing ankle support; duty gear including belt, helmet, protective mask and filter, flashlight, flash-bang pouch, Nomex gloves, Level-III body armor and load-bearing equipment; knee pads/elbow pads; and a physical fitness training uniform appropriate to the season. NOTE: Depending on class size, some training days may run longer than stated in course schedule.
Audience: DOE and DOE-contractor protective force personnel who will be assigned to the position of SPO III (SRT).
Goals & Objectives: Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to do the following: 1) Perform the necessary duties and tasks to be certified at the SPO III level. 2) Pass performance-based and written tests demonstrating the core knowledge and skills required to effectively execute recapture/recovery and pursuit operations and to support interruption, interdiction, neutralization, containment, and denial strategies within the DOE environment as a member of an SRT.
Prerequisites: TRF-100, Tactical Response Force I
PFT-215, Basic Security Police Officer Training

TRF-410, Tactical Response Force 1 Instructor Certification

Delivery Method: Instructor Led Course
Length in Hours: 80
Description: This course provides instructor-level training and certification for the DOE security police officer (SPO) II positions. Instruction includes training design of recapture/recovery support operations, set up, safety concerns, conduct of training, student debrief and evaluation. Student activities will include: lecture/briefs, dry/live fire training in the following subjects: Live Fire Obstacle Course, Vehicle Mounted/Dismounted Fighting, Building Searches, ESS, Dynamic Entry Open/Closed Doors, Diversionary Devices. Instructor-candidates will conduct these lectures and activities under the supervision of the LFR Security Operations instructional staff and be given immediate feedback in regard to presentation and the overall effectiveness of the training delivered. Instructor candidates will be tested (pass/fail) limited scope performance tests (LSPTs), take one written examination requiring an 80% minimum score, must pass the TRF Combined Firearms Qualification with a minimum 80% score MEDICAL RELEASE: Site medical clearance forms MUST be on file with the NTC prior to attendance. DOE personnel must meet medical and fitness standards as mandated in 10 CFR 1046. A valid driver's license is required for participation in the vehicle mounted/dismounted fighting. MANDATORY EQUIPMENT: Students must bring all SPO II duty equipment, gas mask, tactical flashlight, Nomex gloves, and seasonal outdoor gear. NOTE: Dependent upon class size, some training days may run longer than stated in course schedule.
Audience: DOE and DOE contractor protective force personnel.
Goals & Objectives: Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to: 1) Perform as a TRF-100 instructor. 2) Conduct LSPTs and student critiques.
Prerequisites: MIT-111, Basic Instructor Training
PFT-401, Firearms Instructor Certification
TRF-100, Tactical Response Force I
PFT-402, Advanced Weapons Systems Instructor Certification

TRF-420, Tactical Response Force 2 Instructor Certification

Delivery Method: Instructor Led Course
Length in Hours: 80
Description: This course provides instructor-level training and certification to DOE and DOE-contractor protective force personnel who are designated to conduct TRF-200 training at DOE facilities. DOE O 473.3, Protection Program Operations, directs sites with protective force training and qualifications programs to develop and maintain instructors' qualifications and the competencies needed to perform the tasks required of the protective force training mission. This course meets the requirements for the identified instructors to accomplish this mission. TRF-420 addresses methods for teaching close quarters marksmanship with handgun and rifle; close quarters battle techniques; mounted, dismounted, and urban movement techniques; a variety of assault options; and mechanical and ballistic breaching techniques. REQUIREMENTS: Students must, prior to attendance, successfully qualify on applicable DOE firearms courses with all weapons reasonably expected to be used by a security police officer (SPO) III on duty, be site-designated SPO IIIs, meet DOE offensive standards mandated in 10 CFR 1046, meet medical and fitness standards as mandated in CFR 1046, and file medical clearance forms with the NTC. MANDATORY EQUIPMENT: Students must bring firearms and a duty training uniform (long sleeves required) appropriate to the season; boots providing ankle support; duty gear including belt, helmet, and protective mask with filter; a whistle; flash-bang pouch; Nomex gloves; Level-III body armor and tactical equipment; and elbow and knee pads.
Audience: Experienced DOE and DOE-contractor protective force personnel designated to conduct in-service, maintenance training, and qualification standards for TRF-200 students as outlined in DOE O 473.3, Protection Program Operations.
Goals & Objectives: Upon successful completion of this course, instructor candidates will be able to perform as TRF-200 instructors by delivering TRF-200 lectures, administering exercises and LSPTs, and assessing student performance. Upon successful completion, instructor candidates will receive certification to teach the TRF-200 course.
Prerequisites: MIT-111, Basic Instructor Training
PFT-401, Firearms Instructor Certification
PFT-405, Basic Tactical Entry
PFT-406, Basic Tactical Entry Instructor Certification
TRF-200, Tactical Response Force II
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PHY - Physical Protection Courses and Training

PFT-202, Survey of Protective Forces

Delivery Method: Instructor Led Course
Length in Hours: 40
Description: This intermediate-level course focuses on the knowledge and skills necessary to conduct effective and professional compliance and performance evaluations on protective force operations. Course content emphasizes the knowledge and skills associated with key survey functions, including pre-survey planning, document/records reviews, and performance testing. Each section is followed by a practical exercise. REQUIREMENTS: Familiarity with the DOE Facility Survey and Approval Program; Office of Health, Safety and Security, Physical Security Systems Inspector’s Guide; applicable DOE orders; and applicable policy directives.
Audience: DOE and DOE-contractor personnel who conduct (or participate in conducting) periodic safeguards and security (S&S) surveys that include the protective force topical area.
Goals & Objectives: Upon successful completion of this course, students will: 1) Be able to operate as effective and productive members of an S&S survey team. 2) Understand key success behaviors that are involved in surveying protective force operations.
Prerequisites: PHY-130, Basic Survey

PHY-100, Performance Testing of the Protective Force

Delivery Method: Instructor Led Course
Length in Hours: 36
Description: This intermediate-level course presents a more comprehensive treatment of the performance testing (PT) process, with emphasis on developing performance test plans that are specific to the Protective Force (PF) by focusing on the knowledge and skills necessary to develop performance test requirements documents, to coordinate performance testing of protective forces, to evaluate the actual performance test, and to write a post test report. Course content emphasizes the knowledge and skills associated with performance testing requirements, including the planning, coordination, observation, administrative controls, performance testing, and post test activities. Each lesson is followed by an exercise. REQUIREMENTS: Familiarity with the Office of Health, Safety and Security, Protective Force Inspector’s Guide; applicable DOE orders; and applicable policy directives.
Audience: The primary training audience consists of DOE and DOE-contractor Vulnerability Assessment (VA) analysts, performance testers, and VA trainers with Q clearances who are directly involved in the actual conduct, review, or verification of performance tests (PTs), and who have successfully completed the prerequisites for this course.
Goals & Objectives: Upon successful completion of this course, students will: 1) Be able to operate as effective and productive members of a performance testing team. 2) Understand key success behaviors that are involved in the development and the conduct of performance testing of protective force operations. 3) Be able to develop protective force test plans, data collection tools and present results in a meaningful and useful manner.
Prerequisites: VAP-335, Fundamentals of Performance Testing
PFT-390DE, Engagement Simulation Systems
PHY-100DB Introduction to Physical Protection Systems
PHY-100DE, Physical Protection Systems Overview

PHY-100DE, Physical Protection Systems Overview

Delivery Method: eLearning
Length in Hours: 1
Description: This introductory course provides an overview of what a Physical Protection System (PPS) is and how it works. The primary functions of a PPS (Detection, Delay, and Response) and the components and sensors used to accomplish these functions are covered, which include: Assessment components, exterior and interior sensors, access control system, barriers, and response components. PPS terms, DOE area types, sensor classifications, and performance characteristics are also provided. This course has audio and video.
Audience: DOE and DOE-contractor personnel who are directly involved in the design and evaluation of DOE physical protection systems or assigned duties.
Goals & Objectives: Through successful completion of this course, students will have a complete overview of the following concepts within the physical protection Systems: 1) The use of physical protection system components and their integration into the design, planning, and evaluation of a physical protection system, 2) The relationship between intrusion-detection sensors, alarms and the protective force, 3) The importance of evaluating the PPS.
Prerequisites: None

PHY-120, Intermediate Physical Security Systems

Delivery Method: Instructor Led Course
Length in Hours: 40
Description: This intermediate-level course addresses the following topical areas: current sensor technology, performance-testing procedures, and maintenance to ensure operational performance. DOE O 473.3, Protection Program Operations is covered in depth; DOE O 470.4B Admin Chg 1, Safeguards and Security Program is only covered as it relates to physical security systems. The course allows students to gain hands-on experience with various physical security systems. The course includes quizzes and practical exercises. Course emphasis will be on implementation and evaluation. REQUIREMENTS: Students must have a basic understanding of electronic engineering concepts as they relate to sensor operation, and operational experience at their sites (preferably 1-2 years). An outside tour will be conducted, so students should bring walking shoes and jackets, sun block, and a hat, as appropriate for the season.
Audience: DOE and DOE-contractor personnel responsible for designing, installing, implementing, or evaluating physical protection systems within DOE.
Goals & Objectives: Upon successful completion of this course, students will understand the following: 1) The general concepts of probability of detection. 2) Detection phenomenology; circuitry; operational performance-testing; vulnerabilities; and forthcoming technological developments in interior, exterior, and entry-control systems and alarm communications. 3) The advantages of an integrated physical protection system. 4) How sensor technology vulnerabilities affect the selection of components for a system. 5) How to conduct a performance test of systems and components. 6) The reduction/elimination of system and component vulnerabilities.
Prerequisites: PHY-100DE, Physical Protection Systems Overview
PHY-100DB Introduction to Physical Protection Systems

PHY-128DE, Basic Survey Overview

Delivery Method: eLearning
Length in Hours: 1
Description: This introductory online course provides familiarity with the DOE survey process. Lesson 1, Introduction to DOE Oversight and Basic Survey, includes purpose and essential elements of the DOE Oversight Model and survey, review, and self-assessment programs. Lesson 2, Data Collection (Assessments and Methodologies), includes various assessments, methodology of data collection, and performance testing for survey data collection. Lesson 3, Survey Activities Following Data Collection, includes survey activities that follow the data collection process. Lesson 4, Final Report and Safeguards & Security Information Management System (SSIMS), includes elements of the final survey report and core functions of the Safeguards & Security Information Management System (SSIMS).
Audience: DOE and DOE-contractors newly assigned to facility security officer positions or functions.
Goals & Objectives: Through successful completion of this course, students will be familiar with the following basic survey concepts: 1) The purpose and essential elements of the DOE Oversight Model and the survey, review, and self-assessment programs, 2) Various assessments, methodology of data collection, performance testing, and validation for survey data collection, 3) Survey activities that follow the data collection process, and 4) Elements of the final survey report and core functions of the Safeguards and Security Information Management System (SSIMS).
Prerequisites: None

PHY-130, Basic Survey

Delivery Method: Instructor Led Course
Length in Hours: 40
Description: This basic course prepares personnel to participate and assist members of designated safeguards and security assessment teams, whether they be internal or external. The course includes instruction on the assessment process planning, conduct, and post-assessment activities and skills training, performance test planning, interview techniques, and report writing.
Audience: DOE/NNSA and DOE/NNSA-contractor personnel who are directly involved in the planning, conduct, and post activities of safeguards and security program survey and self-assessments (S/SAs).
Goals & Objectives: Upon successful completion of this course, attendees will be able to participate and assist members of S&S assessment teams.
Prerequisites: PHY-128DE, Basic Survey Overview

PHY-200, Physical Security Performance Testing of Systems

Delivery Method: Instructor Led Course
Length in Hours: 35
Description: This intermediate-level course addresses the current sensor technology, performance-testing procedures, and maintenance to ensure operational performance. DOE O 473.3, Protection Program Operations, is covered in depth; DOE O 470.4B Admin Chg 1, Safeguards and Security Program, is covered as it relates to Physical Security Systems.
Audience: DOE and DOE-contractor employee personnel who have experience in Physical Security.
Goals & Objectives: Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to: 1) Identify current sensor technology that applies to their locations. 2) Implement performance-testing procedures. 3) Maintain sensors to ensure optimal performance.
Prerequisites: PHY-120, Intermediate Physical Security Systems

PHY-202, Survey of Physical Security Systems

Delivery Method: Instructor Led Course
Length in Hours: 32
Description: This intermediate-level course focuses on the knowledge and skills DOE survey personnel need to conduct effective and accurate compliance and performance evaluations on facility security systems, installations, and operations. It emphasizes knowledge and skills associated with physical security-related survey functions, and focuses only briefly on more general survey functions (e.g., survey planning and report writing). REQUIREMENTS: Familiarity with the Office of Health, Safety & Security Physical Security Systems Inspector's Guide; DOE O 470.4B, Safeguards and Security Program; applicable DOE manuals; and applicable policy directives. Thorough understanding and working knowledge of physical security systems (i.e., access control, intrusion detection and display, barriers, communications, testing and maintenance, etc.).
Audience: DOE and DOE-contractor personnel who perform or participate in surveys, self-assessments, and other types of inspections or evaluations that include the physical security systems topical area.
Goals & Objectives: Upon successful completion of this course, students will: 1) Be able to participate effectively and productively as members of safeguards and security survey teams. 2) Understand key principles involved in surveys for determining system effectiveness based on performance and on compliance with DOE requirements. 3) Understand key techniques for successfully completing a survey of physical security systems.
Prerequisites: PHY-130, Basic Survey
PHY-100DE, Physical Protection Systems Overview

PHY-210DE, Facility Security Officer Overview

Delivery Method: eLearning
Length in Hours: 0.75
Description: This online course provides familiarity with the DOE Facility Security Officer (FSO) roles and responsibilities. Lesson 1, Introduction and FSO Roles, provides familiarity with the position and role the FSO plays in DOE security. Objectives include identifying the responsibilities of an FSO, the role of an FSO, reference material that is helpful to FSOs, and how many FSOs a contractor may need. Lesson 2, FSO Oversight Responsibilities provides a basic awareness needed by the FSO regarding facility security requirements. Objectives include identifying the document that formally registers a facility within DOE, identifying the purpose of the Foreign Ownership, Control, or Influence (FOCI) program, categorizing facility importance ratings, identifying mandatory S&S awareness briefings, defining an infraction, distinguishing between an administrative inquiry and a criminal investigation, and identifying employee responsibilities during an inquiry. Lesson 3, Other Related Concepts for FSOs, provides an understanding of other security-related concepts for FSOs. Objectives include identifying types of DOE security areas, security area controlled/prohibited articles, security area privately-owned prohibited articles, the purpose of the NMC&A Program, materials designated as SNM, SNM classifications, and the purpose of graded protection.
Audience: DOE or DOE-contractor personnel who have been assigned the role of a DOE-related Facility Security Officer.
Goals & Objectives: Upon successful completion of this course, students will be familiar with: 1) Roles and responsibilities of the facility security officer. 2) Facility security requirements. 3) Security-related concepts.
Prerequisites: None
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SAF - Safety Training Courses and Training

SAF-101DE, 2.0 General Technical Base

Delivery Method: eLearning
Length in Hours: 21
Description: This course is available online from the NTC's Learning Management System (LMS). You may launch and complete the course per course instructions. NOTE: You do not need to contact the NTC Registration Department to take this course. A completion will be automatically added to your Transcript. You should print the completion certificate from your Transcript and provide a copy to your training administrator or supervisor. COURSE DESCRIPTION: The General Technical Base Qualification Standard online training course is intended to support employees in the Technical Qualification Program by providing instruction on important concepts in the General Technical Base Qualification Standard including appropriate reference material. The course includes an exam for each competency. These exams are primarily intended to reinforce learning but they can also serve as a record of the students' understanding of the topics. Upon completion of the course a comprehensive exam can be obtained by the qualifying official to further document comprehension of the course material.
Audience: DOE personnel who are responsible for the safe operation of defense nuclear facilities or who provide assistance, direction, guidance, oversight, or evaluation of contractor technical activities affecting the safe operation of defense nuclear facilities.
Goals & Objectives: The goal of SAF-101DE is to establish common technical competency requirements for all DOE personnel who provide assistance in, direction or guidance to, or oversight or evaluation of contractor technical activities that could impact the safe operation of DOE’s defense nuclear facilities. The General Technical Base Qualification Standard has been developed as a tool to assist program and field offices in the development and implementation of the Technical Qualification Program in their organizations. It is intended to provide a common base for further functional area qualifications.
Prerequisites: None

SAF-102DE, Safety Management Worker Safety and Health Program Overview

Delivery Method: eLearning
Length in Hours: 1
Description: This course is available online from the NTCs Learning Management System (LMS). You may launch and complete the course per course instructions. NOTE: You do not need to contact the NTC Registration Department to take this course. A completion will be automatically added to your Learning History. You should print a completion certificate from your Learning History and provide a copy to your training administrator or supervisor. COURSE DESCRIPTION: This introductory course provides students with an understanding of how worker protection is achieved at DOE sites.
Audience: DOE and DOE-contractor personnel
Goals & Objectives: Upon successful completion of this course, students will be familiar with: 1) The requirements for the development and approval of worker safety and health programs. 2) Management responsibilities and worker rights and responsibilities. 3) Hazard identification, assessment, prevention, and abatement. 4) Applicable safety and health standards. 5) The process steps for obtaining a variance from a safety and health standard. 6) How the 10 CFR 851 enforcement process applies to worker protection.
Prerequisites: None

SAF-115DE, DOE Laser Safety

Delivery Method: eLearning
Length in Hours: 2
Description: **This course is temporarily unavailable.** This online course provides fundamental safety training for DOE personnel who work with or near Class 3B or 4 lasers with exposed beams, or those who service or maintain a laser system where Class 3B or 4 laser radiation may be accessible during these activities. This includes systems that are normally Class 1, but servicing or repair may expose personnel to Class 3 or 4 emissions from an embedded or enclosed laser.
Audience: DOE/NNSA and contractor personnel who need to be knowledgeable of laser safety fundamentals.
Goals & Objectives: Upon completion of this course, students will be able to do the following: 1) Identify the fundamentals of laser safety. 2) Describe the basic properties of laser safety. 3) Identify the most common laser accidents. 4) Identify the bioeffects of laser light to eyes and skin. 5) Recognize nonbeam hazards associated with lasers. 6) Identify laser safety tools. 7) Identify administrative controls. 8) Identify personal protective equipment. 9) Identify fiber optics.
Prerequisites: None

SAF-133, HPI Fundamentals

Delivery Method: Instructor Led Course
Length in Hours: 8
Description: This beginner-level course introduces students to Human Performance Improvement (HPI) with an emphasis on the views and tools for reducing facility accidents and events caused by human error. The course covers how events come about and the steps organizations and workers can take to eliminate events by reducing human error as well as managing defenses/controls to minimize the consequences of errors.
Audience: DOE personnel interested in HPI. The course can accommodate a broad spectrum of participants from various organizational levels and technical specialties. Participants may have varying degrees of experience within DOE and contractor organizations.
Goals & Objectives: Upon completion of this course, students will be able to describe the following: 1) The principles of HPI. 2) The elements that affect safety, quality, and productivity. 3) The methods to reduce human error.
Prerequisites: None

SAF-135V, HPI Event Investigation

Delivery Method: Instructor Led Course
Length in Hours: 24
Description: This beginner-level course, presented over a three-day period, is focused on Human Performance Improvement (HPI) application. Using lectures, exercises, and case study learning activities, participants will be guided through the basic steps of the investigation, analysis, and recommendations/corrective action phases of the process. The participants are first taught the process in three modules using an abbreviated class case study. They are then divided into three teams where they apply what they learned in three similar modules using a more detailed case study. The analysis is performed using the Anatomy of an Event approach to identify root causes as latent organizational conditions. The approach is consistent with DOE ORPS requirements. A detailed resource package is provided to assist with the training and for use by the participants to aid them in analyzing actual events within their home organizations. RECOMMENDATION: Participants should have attended SAF-133V, Human Performance Fundamentals, or be actively involved in HPI implementation.
Audience: DOE personnel who will be conducting causal analysis or developing, modifying, and/or implementing programs or processes designed to improve organizational performance. Training can be tailored somewhat for specific organizational needs.
Goals & Objectives: Upon successful completion of this course, students will have the capability to perform an analysis of an event or near miss employing HPI principles.
Prerequisites: None

SAF-136DE, Human Factors Engineering

Delivery Method: eLearning
Length in Hours: 1
Description: SAF-136DE, Human Factors Engineering is formatted like an online magazine and familiarizes you with HFE and how it applies to the Department of Energy.
Audience: All DOE and DOE-contractor personnel
Goals & Objectives: The goal of this course is to familiarize you with HFE and how it applies to the Department of Energy (DOE). The course objective are: Explain HFE, including: -Describing the field of HFE -Identifying milestones in the history of HFE -Identifying significant accidents where human factors played a role -Listing some benefits of HFE -Explaining how human factors, ranging from human-interface design to organizational choices, affect work Describe how HFE applies to DOE facilities and operations, including: -Recognizing some significant DOE documents that pertain to HFE -Explaining how HFE is applied to work performed at DOE and other federal agencies -Giving examples of how HFE influences specific DOE positions
Prerequisites: None

SAF-152, Quality Assurance Overview

Delivery Method: Instructor Led Course
Length in Hours: 8
Description: This beginner-level course provides DOE's philosophy and approach to implementing quality assurance (QA).
Audience: DOE and DOE-contractor employees interested in an overview of the DOE Quality Assurance Program.
Goals & Objectives: Upon completion of this course, students will be able to: 1) Identify the objectives and applicability of the DOE quality requirements, including the relationship between the quality assurance requirements in 10 CFR 830, Subpart A and DOE O 414.1D, and the relationship between DOE quality requirements and ASME NQA-1 for nuclear facility applications. 2)Recognize the 10 CFR 830.4, General Requirements; 10 CFR 830, Subpart A, Quality Assurance Requirements; and DOE O 414.1D, “Requirements” section, including the Federal responsibilities and the applicability of the requirements to DOE and its contractors. 3) Recognize the content and objectives of the QA criteria in the categories found in DOE O 414.1D: Management, Performance, and Assessment. 4) Identify the quality requirements (and their supporting implementing guides) of DOE O 414.1D, how the quality requirements become nuclear safety requirements for contractors, and how they apply to Federal organizations. 5) Identify the Federal responsibilities for review, approval, and oversight of contractor QA programs developed under 10 CFR 830 and DOE O 414.1D.
Prerequisites: None

SAF-152DE, Quality Assurance Overview

Delivery Method: eLearning
Length in Hours: 0.75
Description: This beginner-level course provides DOE's philosophy and approach to implementing quality assurance (QA).
Audience: DOE and DOE-contractor employees interested in an overview of the DOE Quality Assurance Program.
Goals & Objectives: Upon completion of this course, students will be able to: 1) Identify the objectives and applicability of the DOE quality requirements, including the relationship between the quality assurance requirements in 10 CFR 830, Subpart A and DOE O 414.1D, and the relationship between DOE quality requirements and ASME NQA-1 for nuclear facility applications. 2)Recognize the 10 CFR 830.4, General Requirements; 10 CFR 830, Subpart A, Quality Assurance Requirements; and DOE O 414.1D, “Requirements” section, including the Federal responsibilities and the applicability of the requirements to DOE and its contractors. 3) Recognize the content and objectives of the QA criteria in the categories found in DOE O 414.1D: Management, Performance, and Assessment. 4) Identify the quality requirements (and their supporting implementing guides) of DOE O 414.1D,how the quality requirements become nuclear safety requirements for contractors, and how they apply to Federal organizations. 5)Identify the Federal responsibilities for review, approval, and oversight of contractor QA programs developed under 10 CFR 830 and DOE O 414.1D.
Prerequisites: None

SAF-193DE, Integrated Safety Management Systems Overview

Delivery Method: eLearning
Length in Hours: 0.75
Description: This introductory course provides familiarity with the Department’s philosophy and approach to implementing Integrated Safety Management (ISM).
Audience: DOE and DOE-contractor employees interested in an overview of DOE Integrated Safety Management Systems.
Goals & Objectives: Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to: 1) Identify the objective of ISM. 2) Recognize the purpose, content, and application of DOE P 450.4A, Integrated Safety Management Policy. 3) Discuss how the seven guiding principles of ISM are foundations to DOE safety philosophy. 4) Discuss how applying the five core functions provide increased safety. 5) Identify and list the presented Department manuals, guides, standards, and other documents and practices supporting implementation of ISM. 6) Recognize how Department of Energy Acquisition Regulation (DEAR) clause 48 CFR 970.5223-1, Integration of Environment, Safety, and Health into Work Planning and Execution, requires DOE contractors to implement the ISM process. 7) Identify the requirements in 10 CFR 830 Subpart A, Quality Assurance Requirements, and DOE O 414.1D, Quality Assurance, to integrate the ISM system description with the quality assurance program.
Prerequisites: None

SAF-200, Safety Conscious Work Environment

Delivery Method: Instructor Led Course
Length in Hours: 8
Description: The purpose of this course is to provide Safety Conscious Work Environment (SCWE) training for Department of Energy (DOE) Federal and contractor senior leaders on the importance of establishing and maintaining an open and collaborative work environment within the department. This course will provide knowledge that will help senior leaders create an environment where employees feel free to raise concerns without fear of retribution. This course will provide senior managers with a clear understanding of their roles, responsibilities, accountability, and authority in developing and sustaining an open and collaborative work environment.
Audience: DOE Federal and contractor senior leaders and managers with responsibility for defense nuclear facilities and/or construction projects and the Federal offices with associated oversight responsibilities
Goals & Objectives: Upon successful completion of this course, attendees will be able to identify the first step in their individual journey that will enable them to lead a positive cultural shift in their organization by fostering the development, support, and sustained implementation of a work environment that promotes trust, a questioning attitude, and a willingness to raise issues.
Prerequisites: None

SAF-200DE, Prerequisite to SCWE

Delivery Method: eLearning
Length in Hours: 2
Description: This introductory course provides an overview of a Safety Conscious Work Environment (SCWE). This course is a prerequisite to SAF-200, Safety Conscious Work Environment, and is designed to familiarize students with the concepts and regulatory drivers, including DOE G 450.4-1C, for developing and sustaining an open and collaborative work environment.
Audience: DOE and DOE- contractor senior leaders and managers with responsibility for defense nuclear facilities and/or construction projects and the Federal offices with associated oversight responsibilities.
Goals & Objectives: Upon successful completion of the course, attendees will: 1) Understand “why” the SCWE is being implemented. 2) Be familiar with DOE G 450.4-1C, DOE Integrated Safety Management (ISM) Guide, and specifically Attachment 10, Safety Culture Focus Areas and Associated Attributes. 3) Review their actions and behaviors, and consider how they influence a Safety Conscious Work Environment.
Prerequisites: None

SAF-220DE, Senior Technical Safety Manager Knowledge Base - Season 1

Delivery Method: eLearning
Length in Hours: 4.5
Description: The purpose of this intermediate course is to provide an opportunity for STSM candidates to acquire the knowledge for the supporting knowledge statements contained in the twenty-two competency statements in DOE-STD-1175-2006, Senior Technical Safety Manager Functional Area Qualification Standard. This course is season 1 of 4 and covers the STSM knowledge requirements in the following areas as they apply to safety: 1) Price-Anderson Amendments Act of 1988 2) DOE Directives System 3) Federal and Contractor Training 4) Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board and 5) Technical Contract Management. The remaining competencies are covered in Seasons 2 – 4. Course length is 4 to 4.5 hours.
Audience: Current or prospective Senior Technical Safety Managers at DOE facilities.
Goals & Objectives: This course is season 1 of 4 and covers the STSM knowledge requirements in the following areas as they apply to safety: 1) Price-Anderson Amendments Act of 1988 2) DOE Directives System 3) Federal and Contractor Training 4) Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board and 5) Technical Contract Management. The remaining competencies are covered in Seasons 2 – 4. Course length is 4 to 4.5 hours.
Prerequisites: None

SAF-220DE, Senior Technical Safety Manager Knowledge Base - Season 2

Delivery Method: eLearning
Length in Hours: 6
Description: The purpose of these intermediate courses is to provide an opportunity for STSM candidates to acquire the knowledge for the supporting knowledge statements contained in the twenty-two competency statements in DOE-STD-1175-2006, Senior Technical Safety Manager Functional Area Qualification Standard. This course is season 2 of 4 and covers the STSM knowledge requirements in the following areas as they apply to safety: 1) Safeguards and Security 2) Integrated Safety Management 3) Human Performance Improvement 4) Strong Nuclear Safety Culture 5) Problem Solving and Decision Making and 6) Communication. The remaining competencies are covered in Seasons 1, 3, and 4. Course length is 5 to 6 hours.
Audience: Current or prospective Senior Technical Safety Managers at DOE facilities.
Goals & Objectives: This course is season 2 of 4 and covers the STSM knowledge requirements in the following areas as they apply to safety: 1) Safeguards and Security 2) Integrated Safety Management 3) Human Performance Improvement 4) Strong Nuclear Safety Culture 5) Problem Solving and Decision Making and 6) Communication. The remaining competencies are covered in Seasons 1, 3, and 4.
Prerequisites: None

SAF-220DE, Senior Technical Safety Manager Knowledge Base - Season 3

Delivery Method: eLearning
Length in Hours: 5
Description: The purpose of these intermediate courses is to provide an opportunity for STSM candidates to acquire the knowledge for the supporting knowledge statements contained in the twenty-two competency statements in DOE-STD-1175-2006, Senior Technical Safety Manager Functional Area Qualification Standard. This course is season 3 of 4 and covers the STSM knowledge requirements in the following areas as they apply to safety: 1) Quality Assurance 2) Conduct of Operations 3) Configuration Management 4) Emergency Management 5) Maintenance Management and 6) Safety Basis. The remaining competencies are covered in Seasons 1, 2, and 4. Course length is 4 to 5 hours.
Audience: Current or prospective Senior Technical Safety Managers at DOE facilities.
Goals & Objectives: This course is season 3 of 4 and covers the STSM knowledge requirements in the following areas as they apply to safety: 1) Quality Assurance 2) Conduct of Operations 3) Configuration Management 4) Emergency Management 5) Maintenance Management and 6) Safety Basis. The remaining competencies are covered in Seasons 1, 2, and 4.
Prerequisites: None

SAF-220DE, Senior Technical Safety Manager Knowledge Base - Season 4

Delivery Method: eLearning
Length in Hours: 6
Description: The purpose of these intermediate courses is to provide an opportunity for STSM candidates to acquire the knowledge for the supporting knowledge statements contained in the twenty-two competency statements in DOE-STD-1175-2006, Senior Technical Safety Manager Functional Area Qualification Standard. This course is season 4 of 4 and covers the STSM knowledge requirements in the following areas as they apply to safety: 1) Environmental Requirements 2) Waste Management 3) Program and Project Management 4) Radiation Protection Program 5) Worker Protection Standards and 6) DOE Employee Concerns Program. The remaining competencies are covered in Seasons 1, 2, and 3. Course length is 5 to 6 hours.
Audience: Current or prospective Senior Technical Safety Managers at DOE facilities.
Goals & Objectives: This course is season 4 of 4 and covers the STSM knowledge requirements in the following areas as they apply to safety: 1) Environmental Requirements 2) Waste Management 3) Program and Project Management 4) Radiation Protection Program 5) Worker Protection Standards and 6) DOE Employee Concerns Program. The remaining competencies are covered in Seasons 1, 2, and 3.
Prerequisites: None

SAF-221, Senior Technical Safety Manager Applications

Delivery Method: Instructor Led Course
Length in Hours: 24
Description: This advanced course will provide Senior Technical Safety Manager (STSM) incumbents the ability to refresh and update their skill level of selected performance requirements in DOE-STD-1175-2013, Senior Technical Safety Manager Functional Area Qualification (FAQ) Standard. RECOMMENDATIONS: Candidates should meet the STSM educational and experience requirements outlined in DOE O 426.1 Chg. 1, Federal Technical Capability. Candidates should possess at least a familiarity-level knowledge of all the topics covered in the qualification standard and a working-level knowledge of most of the topics. In addition, the following courses are recommended prior to taking this course: • SAF-101DE, General Technical Basis • SAF-220DE, STSM Knowledge Base • IS-1.a, Emergency Manager: An Orientation to the Position or • OS-700a, National Incident Management System (NIMS) An Introduction • IS-775, EOC Management and Operations
Audience: DOE and DOE-contractor employees currently in STSM positions who need to requalify, and for new candidates for STSM positions who are initially qualifying.
Goals & Objectives: Upon successful completion of the course, students will demonstrate the ability to perform the following skill requirements in the STSM Functional Area Qualification Standard: 1) Training Assessment. 2) Integrated Safety Management and a Strong Nuclear Safety Culture. 3) Safety Basis. 4) Safety Basis Review. 5) Configuration Management and Safety Systems. 6) Assessments. 7) Occurrence Reports and Accident Investigations. 8) Worker Protection. 9) Safeguards and Security.
Prerequisites: None

SAF-222, Senior Technical Safety Manager Case Study Applications

Delivery Method: Instructor Led Course
Length in Hours: 24
Description: The purpose of this intermediate course is to provide Senior Technical Safety Manager candidates with the opportunity to apply the knowledge and skills in DOE-STD-1175-2013, Senior Technical Safety Manager Functional Area Qualification Standard to real-world situations based on case studies gleaned from actual events that have occurred within DOE facilities.
Audience: Current STSMs who need to requalify and would like a refresher course or those who are pursuing initial STSM qualification.
Goals & Objectives: Upon successful completion of the course, students will successfully apply core STSM knowledge using case studies to selected skills identified in DOE-STD-1175-2013, STSM Functional Area Qualification Standard. Selected skills from the following competency areas are used in this course: 1) Decision making; 2) Employee concerns and Differing Professional Opinions; 3) Human Factors Engineering; 4) Oversight/Assessments; 5) Waste Management & Environmental; and 6) Safety Basis. RECOMMENDED PRE-REQUISITES: SAF-101DE: General Technical Base; SAF-220DE STSM Knowledge Base It is recommended that students review the following lessons in SAF-220DE, STSM Knowledge Base prior to attending the course: 1. Problem Solving & Decision Making – Season 2, Lesson 5 2. Safety Basis – Season 3, Lesson 6 3. Environmental Requirements – Season 4, Lesson 1 4. Waste Management – Season 4, Lesson 2 5. Radiation Protection – Season 4, Lesson 4 6. Employee Concerns – Season 4, Lesson 6
Prerequisites: None

SAF-230, Accident Investigation

Delivery Method: Instructor Led Course
Length in Hours: 40
Description: This intermediate-level, performance-based course presents a week-long, intensive accident investigation simulation that illustrates DOE’s investigative process. The course covers roles and responsibilities, planning, teamwork, collecting and controlling evidence, core analytical techniques, report writing, and quality reviews. Note: DOE Accident Investigation Programs received permission from the American Board of Industrial Hygiene (ABIH) to award 4.5 certification maintenance (CM) points and the National Safety Council to award 6 continuing education units (CEUs) for attendance, participation, and the successful completion of the DOE Accident Investigation Course (on the basis of 1 CEU per 6 hours of training). These CEUs may be used toward continuing certification in a variety of professional fields. Completion of this course will satisfy the training requirements in DOE Order 225.1B, Accident Investigations, for both chairpersons and DOE accident investigators. This course is also designed for contractors who want to use the techniques to assess and evaluate their operations to prevent accidents. RECOMMENDATIONS: Familiarity with DOE Order 225.1B, Accident Investigations
Audience: DOE employees who are likely to (or want to) serve as DOE accident investigators or as board chairpersons on a DOE accident investigation board.
Goals & Objectives: Upon successful completion of this course, students will: 1) Have an initial understanding of the accident scenario. 2) Have an understanding of the accident events and causal factors. 3) Have an understanding of barrier analysis. 4) Have an understanding of change analysis. 5) Determine causal factors by analyzing significant events and conditions on the events and causal factors chart. 6) Have an understanding of root cause analysis. 7) Be able to develop and verify conclusions and judgments of need.
Prerequisites: None

SAF-230DE, Accident Investigation Overview

Delivery Method: eLearning
Length in Hours: 5
Description: This eLearning Course examines the role of an accident investigator on a DOE Accident Investigation Board (AIB). It focuses on the methodologies, models, and analytical tools used by the AIB to investigate an accident with the goal of preventing future accidents. This course reviews the procedures and processes required by DOE O 225.1B, Accident Investigations, and the use of the DOE Handbook of Accident and Operational Safety Analysis, Volume 1: Accident Analysis Techniques.
Audience:
Goals & Objectives: Upon completion of SAF-230DE Accident Investigation Overview, students will understand the following: 1) The purpose of accident investigations and the initial procedures that occur when an accident is reported. 2) The procedures related to collecting and analyzing physical and human evidence. 3) The models and methodologies used in analyzing accident causal factors. 4) The process and purpose for developing an Events and Casual Factors (ECF) chart. 5) The process for developing an AIB Final Report.
Prerequisites: None

SAF-261, Conduct of Operations

Delivery Method: Instructor Led Course
Length in Hours: 24
Description: This intermediate-level performance-based course provides students an opportunity to apply the principles associated with a formal operating environment as enveloped by DOE Order 422.1, Conduct of Operations. Students will acquire a detailed understanding of the importance for applying "best practices" for conducting both operations and field oversight functions. Through problem-solving scenarios, students will analyze and discuss video and written case studies from several industries. Through facilitated discussions, students will derive relevant approaches and solutions, as well as show practical application to their work environment. This course includes a practical exercise (walk-through observation techniques) that applies theory to practice followed by a lessons learned discussion.
Audience: DOE and DOE-contractor personnel who require a working-level knowledge of Conduct of Operations. This may include those pursuing DOE/NNSA qualification as Senior Technical Safety Manager (STSM) and contractor management and operations supervisors.
Goals & Objectives: Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to: 1) Explain the program requirements of DOE Order 422.1, Conduct of Operations. 2) Explain the roles and responsibilities of DOE/NNSA and contractor line managers for conduct of operations.
Prerequisites: None

SAF-269, Fundamentals of Work Planning & Control

Delivery Method: Instructor Led Course
Length in Hours: 16
Description: Introduce students to the basic concepts and processes that provide an acceptable approach to accomplish activity-level work conducted at U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) sites, facilities, and projects. The approach taught is based on the guidelines and processes provided in EFCOG Contractor Guide 2012-0001 Rev 0, May 18, 2012, EFCOG WP&C Program Guideline Document. The course will be in a classroom setting consisting of instructor-led lecture and discussions. Students will apply their knowledge of the concepts and processes in a capstone exercise which will be evaluated using provided CRADs. The students will provide each other feedback based on the evaluations performed.
Audience: Federal personnel responsible for oversight of, and contractor personnel responsible for conducting, activity-level work at DOE sites, facilities, and projects.
Goals & Objectives: At the completion of this course, students will apply the concepts and processes of work planning and control in the preparation of an activity-level work activity and the evaluation of a work planning and control program. 1) Explain the basic concepts and processes that provide an acceptable approach to accomplish activity-level work conducted at U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) sites, facilities, and projects. 2) Given an activity-level work task, define the scope of work, determine the proper planning team make-up and define acceptance criteria. 3) Given a defined activity-level work scope, conduct a job-hazard analysis. 4) Given the results of a JHA for activity-level work, develop an Activity Level Work Control Document. 5) Explain the concepts of performing activity level work within determined controls. 6) Explain the concepts of activity level post job feedback and continuous improvement. 7) Given the Implementation CRADS in Appendix I and a Work Planning & Control Program Description, conduct a phase 1 assessment.
Prerequisites: None

SAF-270, Safety System Oversight Duties and Responsibilities

Delivery Method: Instructor Led Course
Length in Hours: 24
Description: This intermediate course is intended for technical personnel who want to develop integrated skills involving safety system oversight (SSO) duties and responsibilities. The course presents and discusses the overall DOE/NNSA requirements, expectations, basis, techniques, and guidance involving the safety oversight roles and responsibilities. The course also emphasizes the interfaces and working relationships between SSO personnel and other personnel involved in the SSO. Using short exercises and activities, the course includes methods for accomplishing SSO. Prospective students are expected to meet or exceed DOE entry-level requirements for SSO personnel. This includes completion of the General Technical Base Qualification Standard and one Functional Area Qualification. Students are expected to have a working-level knowledge of the facility-specific safety systems to which they are assigned and the ability to provide oversight and assessments. Students are also expected to have a basic understanding of nuclear and facility safety requirements.
Audience: DOE personnel serving in SSO positions. Others who might find the course useful include Facility Representatives, Authorization Basis staff, Senior Technical Safety Managers, and Contractor Cognizant System Engineers.
Goals & Objectives: Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to: 1) Identify SSO duties and responsibilities. 2) Identify the interface between the SSO and other personnel involved in safety system oversight. 3) Identify contractor requirements for safety system oversight. 4) Develop performance-based issues. 5) Describe how to review the contractor system health status. 6) Describe how to conduct periodic evaluations of system configuration. 7) Describe how to evaluate the material condition of the systems and components. 8) Describe how to evaluate the reliability of system functions. 9) Perform an exercise review of contractor response to system abnormalities. 10) Perform an exercise review of the contractor system engineer program. 11) Plan, conduct, and report an assessment. 12) Determine funding and resources for the safety system.
Prerequisites: None

SAF-271, Safety System Oversight Assessments

Delivery Method: Instructor Led Course
Length in Hours: 16
Description: This intermediate-level course provides the basic knowledge and skills for Safety System Oversight (SSO) personnel necessary to plan, conduct, and report assessments. These skills are relative to SSO assessment duties and responsibilities defined in DOE O 426.1 Chg 1, Federal Technical Capability, Appendix D, Safety System Oversight, Duties, Responsibilities, Knowledge, Skills, and Abilities. RECOMMENDED: SAF-270, Safety System Oversight Duties and Responsibilities.
Audience: DOE/NNSA technical personnel whose duties and responsibilities include safety system oversight. These personnel are highly experienced and highly qualified in the technical aspects of their assigned safety systems.
Goals & Objectives: Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to describe the following: 1) Essential Elements of Assessments. 2) Assessment Methods. 3) Planning Assessments. 4) Conducting Assessments. 5) Reporting Assessments. 6) Feedback.
Prerequisites: None

SAF-272V, Configuration Management

Delivery Method: Instructor Led Course
Length in Hours: 16
Description: This intermediate-level course provides an introduction to the content and intent of the information contained in DOE-STD-1073-2003, Configuration Management Program.
Audience: DOE and DOE-contractor personnel who will be involved with, or develop and implement Configuration Management.
Goals & Objectives: Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to describe the following: 1) The objectives of configuration management. 2) Configuration management requirements. 3) The five elements of the configuration management process. 4) Change control.
Prerequisites: None

SAF-280, Integration of Safety into the Design Process

Delivery Method: Instructor Led Course
Length in Hours: 16
Description: The intermediate-level course provides the central ideas and themes of DOE-STD-1189 and conveys lessons learned from project management implementation of the Standard. The course was developed to show how project management, engineering design, and safety analysis can be successfully implemented.
Audience: DOE and DOE-contractor engineers, project managers, and safety personnel involved in all phases of the lifecycle process.
Goals & Objectives: Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to describe the following: 1) Drivers requiring the use of DOE-STD-1189. 2) Integrating safety into design. 3) The DOE Integrated Project Team. 4) The contractor Integrated Project Team. 5) Safety design strategy. 6) Project Lifecycle. 7) Key safety-related activities. 8) Safety-related documents. 9) Lessons learned.
Prerequisites: None

SAF-281, Design of Safety Significant Safety Instrumented Systems

Delivery Method: Instructor Led Course
Length in Hours: 16
Description: The intermediate-level course is designed for experienced DOE and DOE-contractor personnel who provide support for the design, procurement, installation, testing, maintenance, operation, and quality assurance of safety instrumented systems (SIS) that may be used at DOE nonreactor nuclear facilities for safety significant (SS) functions. RECOMMENDATIONS: Students should be familiar with DOE STD 1195-2011, Design of Safety Significant Safety Instrumented Systems Used at DOE Nonreactor Nuclear Facilities. Students should be familiar with ANSI/ISA 84.00.01-2004, Functional Safety: Safety Instrumented Systems for the Process Industry Sector.
Audience: Experienced DOE and DOE contractor personnel who provide support for the design, procurement, installation, testing, maintenance, operation, and quality assurance of SIS that may be used at DOE nonreactor facilities for SS functions.
Goals & Objectives: Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to demonstrate the following: 1) Familiarity with DOE-STD-1195-2011, Design of Safety Significant Safety Instrumented Systems Used at DOE Nonreactor Nuclear Facilities. 2) Understanding of two acceptable design approaches in DOE-STD-1195-2011, Design of Safety Significant Safety Instrumented Systems Used at DOE Nonreactor Nuclear Facilities. 3) Understanding of the five life-cycle steps in ANSI/ISA 84.00.01-2004, Functional Safety: Safety Instrumented Systems for the Process Industry Sector. 4) Understanding how the safety integrity level (SIL) determination methodology determines the SIL of the safety significant safety instrumented system credited with preventing or mitigating a hazardous event by assessing the total number of independent protection layers (IPLs) credited with protecting the worker or public from this event. 5) Understanding of the factors affecting the design of safety significant safety instrumented systems.
Prerequisites: None

SAF-290, Readiness Review Team Member

Delivery Method: Instructor Led Course
Length in Hours: 24
Description: This intermediate-course is based on the requirements in DOE Order 425.1D, Verification of Readiness to Startup or Restart Nuclear Facilities, and guidance provided in DOE Standard 3006-2010, Planning and Conducting Readiness Reviews. Role playing group segments are integrated into this course, demonstrating common situations for members on an Operational Readiness Review (ORR) or Readiness Assessment (RA). Key elements covered in the course include: 1) Relationship of authorization basis and safety basis to the readiness review process. 2) Introduction to performance-based concepts. 3) Introduction to readiness process. 4) Team member responsibilities. 5) Development of criteria and review approach documents (CRADS). 6) Forming a mental model. 7) Performance-based assessment methods. 8) Documenting the review process and reporting the review. 9) Checklist readiness assessments.
Audience: DOE employees in the readiness review process. Students are expected to be familiar with DOE site facilities, contractor processes, Integrated Safety Management (ISM), and applicable regulatory requirements (DOE orders and industry standards).
Goals & Objectives: Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to describe the following: 1) The background behind the readiness review process. 2) The mechanics of the performance. 3) The process of reporting a Readiness Review related to DOE orders and directives.
Prerequisites: None

SAF-291, Readiness Review Team Leader

Delivery Method: Instructor Led Course
Length in Hours: 8
Description: This advanced-level course presents team leader roles and responsibilities, and provides specific techniques for performing those responsibilities as a Readiness Review Team Leader. The course offers detailed discussion on the pitfalls and difficulties that arise during the readiness review process, along with suggestions and methods for dealing with these difficulties. Role playing group segments are integrated into this course. Key areas covered by the course include: 1) Overview of roles and responsibilities in the readiness review process. 2) Development of the Implementation Plan (IP), including Criteria and Review Approach Documents (CRADS). 3) Identification of functional areas and required team members. 4) Assembling of the team. 5) Preparing for the Readiness Review. 6) Planning for and conducting the pre-review site visit. 7) Managing the review, including team management and interacting with the assessed organization. 8) Reporting the results of the Readiness Review, including the determination of guidelines for pre-start and post-start findings.
Audience: DOE and DOE-contractor personnel with experience as a team member or team leader on DOE or Contractor Readiness Review.
Goals & Objectives: Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to describe the following: 1) Team leader roles and responsibilities. 2) Methods to control team dynamics. 3) Strategies to manage interaction with the assessed organization. 4) How to assist in readiness review preparation. 5) Tools to ensure an effective Readiness Review.
Prerequisites: None

SAF-340, Nuclear Executive Leadership Training (NELT)

Delivery Method: Instructor Led Course
Length in Hours: 40
Description: This advanced course provides structured supplemental training for DOE/NNSA senior personnel to assist them in improving their capability to fulfill safety and leadership responsibilities within the Department's defense nuclear complex. Successful completion satisfies the minimum requirements to support delegation of safety responsibilities as described in the Deputy Secretary of Energy's memorandum, Delegation of Safety Authorities, dated December 27, 2005.
Audience: Nomination only. Potential nominees include senior managers from DOE and NNSA Headquarters. Nominees are selected by their respective Assistant Secretary or the NNSA Principal Deputy Administrator.
Goals & Objectives: Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to explain the following: 1) ISM. 2) Safety culture. 3) Risk and risk acceptance. 4) Integrating safety and design. 5) Environmental issues and EMS. 6) Differing professional opinions. 7) HPI event analysis.
Prerequisites: None

SAF-340DV, NELT: Differing Professional Opinions and Employee Concerns

Delivery Method: eLearning
Length in Hours: 1.35
Description: Jim McConnell and Carol Sohn's presentation on Differing Professional Opinions & Employee Concerns from the December 2011 Nuclear Executive Leadership Training.
Audience: DOE and DOE-contractor personnel
Goals & Objectives: Upon successful completion of this video, students will be familiar with the Differing Professional Opinions process and the evolution of Employee Concerns program.
Prerequisites: None

SAF-340DV, NELT: Environmental Sustainability and Compliance

Delivery Method: eLearning
Length in Hours: 1.17
Description: Andy Lawrence's presentation on Environmental Sustainability and Environmental Compliance from the December 2011 Nuclear Executive Leadership Training.
Audience: DOE and DOE-contractor personnel
Goals & Objectives: Upon successful completion of this video, students will be familiar with managing the environmental aspects of DOE’s activities.
Prerequisites: None

SAF-340DV, NELT: Governance Transformation and Oversight

Delivery Method: eLearning
Length in Hours: 1.38
Description: Johnny Moore and Ted Sherry's presentations on Governance Transformation and Oversight from the December 2011 Nuclear Executive Leadership Training.
Audience: DOE and DOE-contractor personnel
Goals & Objectives: Upon successful completion of this video, students will be familiar with the fundamentals of the oversight process, contractor assurance systems and governance transformation across DOE.
Prerequisites: None

SAF-340DV, NELT: Human Performance Improvement

Delivery Method: eLearning
Length in Hours: 3.17
Description: Mike Schoener's presentation on Human Performance Improvement from the December 2011 Nuclear Executive Leadership Training.
Audience: DOE and DOE-contractor personnel
Goals & Objectives: Upon successful completion of this video, students will be provided with an overview of Human Performance principles and applications and the leader’s role in human performance.
Prerequisites: None

SAF-340DV, NELT: Managing the Safety Basis

Delivery Method: eLearning
Length in Hours: 2.92
Description: Dr. Steve Krahn's presentation on Managing the Safety Basis from the December 2011 Nuclear Executive Leadership Training.
Audience: DOE and DOE-contractor personnel
Goals & Objectives: Upon successful completion of this video, students will be familiar with the fundamentals of complying with, maintaining and revising the authorization basis.
Prerequisites: None

SAF-340DV, NELT: NEPA Compliance

Delivery Method: eLearning
Length in Hours: 0.87
Description: Carol Borgstrom's presentation on National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) Compliance from the December 2011 Nuclear Executive Leadership Training.
Audience: DOE and DOE-contractor personnel
Goals & Objectives: Upon successful completion of this video, students will be familiar with NEPA compliance.
Prerequisites: None

SAF-340DV, NELT: Nuclear Safety Risk Management

Delivery Method: eLearning
Length in Hours: 0.97
Description: Jim O'Brien's presentation on Nuclear Safety Risk Management from the December 2011 Nuclear Executive Leadership Training.
Audience: DOE and DOE-contractor personnel
Goals & Objectives: Upon successful completion of this video, students will be familiar with the department’s risk management initiative.
Prerequisites: None

SAF-340DV, NELT: Radiation Protection

Delivery Method: eLearning
Length in Hours: 0.9
Description: Andrew Wallo's presentation on Radiation Protection of the Public and Environment & Radiological Control and Release of Property from the December 2011 Nuclear Executive Leadership Training.
Audience: DOE and DOE-contractor personnel
Goals & Objectives: Upon successful completion of this video, students will be familiar with the fundamentals of Radiation Protection of the Public and Environment & Radiological Control and Release of Property.
Prerequisites: None

SAF-340DV, NELT: Safety Culture

Delivery Method: eLearning
Length in Hours: 3.48
Description: Jim McConnell's presentation on Safety Culture in High-Reliability Organizations from the December 2011 Nuclear Executive Leadership Training.
Audience: DOE and DOE-contractor personnel
Goals & Objectives: Upon successful completion of this video, students will be familiar with the fundamentals of Safety Culture, Safety Culture and the relationship to events and accidents and Safety Culture trouble signs.
Prerequisites: None

SAF-340DV, NELT: Safety in the Design Process

Delivery Method: eLearning
Length in Hours: 2.5
Description: Teresa Robbin's presentation on Integration of Safety into the Design Process from the December 2011 Nuclear Executive Leadership Training.
Audience: DOE and DOE-contractor personnel
Goals & Objectives: Upon successful completion of this video, students will be familiar with the fundamentals of Integrating Safety into the Design Process.
Prerequisites: None

SAF-340DV, NELT: The Nuclear Professional

Delivery Method: eLearning
Length in Hours: 1.68
Description: Fred Tollison's presentation on The Nuclear Professional from the December 2011 Nuclear Executive Leadership Training.
Audience: DOE and DOE-contractor personnel
Goals & Objectives: Upon successful completion of this video, students will be familiar with the special nature of nuclear activities, the application of standards, effects of procedures and erosion of the work environment.
Prerequisites: None

SAF-382V, Basics of Performance Measurements

Delivery Method: Instructor Led Course
Length in Hours: 24
Description: This intermediate-level course is designed to teach students the basic knowledge and skills (with numerous applied exercises) necessary to successfully design, develop, implement, and utilize a performance measurement system, irrespective of organizational affiliation or specific mission.
Audience: DOE and DOE-contractor personnel interested in performance measurement.
Goals & Objectives: Upon completion of this course, students will be able to describe the following: 1) Key elements of performance measurement systems. 2) Real goals. 3) Evidence-based management. 4) Performance measurement. 5) Key terms (performance, variabilitly, trend, and limit). 6) Concepts of performance-related success and failure space. 7) Performance formulas. 8) Performance curves. 9) Asymptote. 10) Innovation in performance improvement. 11) Concepts of enterprise performance management. 12) EPM system model, its components, and role. 13) Six key steps of a performance measurement system.
Prerequisites: None

SAF-384, DOE Oversight and Implementation

Delivery Method: Instructor Led Course
Length in Hours: 24
Description: This intermediate-level course presents and tests a student’s ability to implement oversight activities to meet the requirements of DOE Order 226.1B. Department of Energy Oversight Policy. Order 226.1B establishes DOE policy for assurance systems and processes established by DOE contractors and oversight programs performed by DOE line management and independent oversight organizations. The course incorporates lecture, discussion, and dynamic learning activities. RECOMMENDATIONS: Familiarity with DOE Order 226.1B, Implementation of Department of Energy Oversight Policy.
Audience: DOE Oversight personnel
Goals & Objectives: Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to: 1) Explain the concept of oversight. 2) Describe the requirements for DOE Line Management Oversight. 3) Identify the elements of a Contractor Assurance System. 4) Describe an oversight process. 5) Identify baseline oversight requirements. 6) Describe the process to develop a performance plan, including objectives, measures, and expectation. 7) Assess program performance. 8) Assess contractor assurance system confidence. 9) Determine the level and mix of oversight. 10) Develop an integrated oversight plan. 11) Review the conduct of assessments. 12) Conduct an operational awareness activity. 13) Understand the process to analyze and trend data. 14) Describe the process used to identify and disposition issues. 15) Describe the process used to identify, develop, and discuss the dissemination of lessons learned. 16) Describe the process to evaluate contractor performance. 17) Describe the process used to maintain and control the oversight process. 18) Describe the process used for Federal assurance.
Prerequisites: None

SAF-385, Assessment Techniques

Delivery Method: Instructor Led Course
Length in Hours: 24
Description: This intermediate-level course will provide a foundation for beginning assessors and refresher training for experienced assessors. RECOMMENDATIONS: DOE O 226.1B, Implementation of Department of Energy Oversight Policy; DOE G 414.1-1B, Management and Independent Assessments Guide for Use with 10 CFR Part 830, Subpart A; and DOE O 414.1D, Quality Assurance.
Audience: DOE/NNSA personnel with oversight and assessment responsibilities, and contractor and subcontractor personnel performing self-assessments or participating in other organizational assessments.
Goals & Objectives: Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: 1) Understand the fundamental elements of an assessment and basic skills required to be an assessor. 2) Develop a Criteria Review and Approach Document (CRAD). 3) Understand how to perform a document review and record the results. 4) Understand how to conduct an assessment interview. 5) Conduct an observation to correctly identify strengths and issues. 6) Describe the process to develop findings and concerns. 7) Use various report formats for communicating assessment results.
Prerequisites: None

SAF-386, Fundamentals of Performance Management

Delivery Method: Instructor Led Course
Length in Hours: 16
Description: This intermediate-level course is designed to teach students the basic knowledge and skills (with numerous applied exercises) necessary to successfully design, develop, implement, and utilize a performance management system, irrespective of organizational affiliation or specific mission.
Audience: DOE and DOE-contractor personnel involved in oversight and implementation of performance management.
Goals & Objectives: Upon completion of this course, students will be able to describe the following: 1) Key elements of performance management systems. 2) Real goals. 3) Evidence-based management. 4) Performance measurement. 5) Key terms (performance, variability, trend, and limit). 6) Concepts of performance-related success and failure space. 7) Performance formulas. 8) Performance curves. 9) Asymptote. 10) Innovation in performance improvement. 11) Concepts of enterprise performance management. 12) EPM system model, its components, and role. 13) Six key steps of a performance measurement system.
Prerequisites: None

SAF-605, Introduction to Nuclear Safety Risk Assessment

Delivery Method: Instructor Led Course
Length in Hours: 24
Description: The purpose of this course is to introduce Department of Energy (DOE) and DOE-contractor nuclear safety professionals to probabilistic risk assessment (PRA) techniques and their potential role in risk-informed decision making as it relates to nuclear safety. The course will provide knowledge about the DOE’s draft standard on the development and use of PRA in nuclear safety applications. It will also potentially support satisfying a required competency of DOE-STD-1183-2007, Nuclear Safety Specialists Functional Area Qualification Standard for DOE Defense Nuclear Facilities Technical Personnel, for demonstrating familiarity with the terminology associated with PRA techniques.
Audience: The audience for this course will include DOE Federal and contractor nuclear safety staff and midlevel site supervisors and managers who may be involved in resolving nuclear safety issues and in performing or reviewing nuclear facility safety analyses.
Goals & Objectives: Upon completion of this course, the student will have a basic understanding of risk terms and concepts, probabilistic risk assessment, human reliability analysis, event and consequence analysis, and risk-informed decision-making.
Prerequisites: None

SAF-701, Safety Basis Overview

Delivery Method: Instructor Led Course
Length in Hours: 16
Description: This beginner-level course is designed for individuals involved in safety analysis and the development, implementation, and maintenance of Safety Basis documents for DOE activities, facilities, and sites.
Audience: DOE and DOE-contractor employees who are new safety analysts and those with safety basis responsibilities.
Goals & Objectives: Upon successful completion of this course, students will: 1) Describe the significant legislation leading to the current state of Safety Basis requirements and oversight of DOE hazardous facilities, processes, and activities. 2) Describe the Safety Basis development process. 3) Describe the Hazard Analysis process as it relates to Safety Basis development. 4) Describe the Facility Hazard Categorization process as it relates to Safety Basis development. 5) Describe the hazard control development process for a DOE facility Safety Basis. 6) Describe the Safety Basis approval process.
Prerequisites: None

SAF-710, Safety Basis Document Preparation

Delivery Method: Instructor Led Course
Length in Hours: 24
Description: This intermediate-level course is designed to provide safety analysts with the knowledge and skills needed to develop a non-reactor nuclear facility Documented Safety Analysis (DSA) in accordance with requirements of 10 CFR 830, DOE Safe Harbor Standard 3009-94, and concepts from DOE Guide 421.1-2A, Implementation Guide for Use in Developing Documented Safety Analyses to Meet Subpart B of 10 CFR 830.
Audience: DOE and DOE-contractor safety analysts and safety personnel whose responsibilities include preparing a Safety Basis document for DOE facilities.
Goals & Objectives: Upon successful completion of this course, students will understand: 1) Facts and policies included within 10 CFR 830 and DOE-STD-3009-94. 2) Hazard categorization and how it is used to support safety basis document preparation. 3) Layout, function, and hazards of a fictional waste receipt and analysis facility (WRAF). 4) The important elements of site characteristics that will be included in Chapter 1 of a DSA. 5) The important elements of facility information that will be included in Chapter 2 of a DSA. 6) The expected process, steps, and products for performing a hazard analysis (hazard evaluation) given DOE-STD-3009-94. 7) The primary reasons that a DSA/TSR could be rejected by NNSA. 8) How to conduct and document an accident analysis using DOE-STD-3009-94 methodology. 9) The documentation needed to support safety basis requirements for DSA Chapter 4, Derivation of Hazard Controls. 10) How to organize controls in a manner that bridges the DSA to the TSR given DOE-STD-3009-94 and safety-class (SC), safety-significant (SS), and TSR-level controls identified in Chapters 3 and 4. 11) The importance of consistency and linkage across the DSA. 12) The documentation requirements for safety management program (SMP) chapters of the DSA, Chapters 6-17. 13) How to integrate safety into the design process using DOE-STD-1189. 14) The structure and documentation requirements for the DSA executive summary.
Prerequisites: None

SAF-720, Hazard Identification

Delivery Method: Instructor Led Course
Length in Hours: 8
Description: This intermediate-level course is designed to provide safety analysts with the working knowledge and skills needed to identify, record, and screen all known facility hazards. The course discusses the various types of hazards that exist in the workplace and their "harm to humans" characteristics. It also covers the processes used to systematically identify and inventory hazardous conditions (material and energy sources) associated with a facility process or associated operation.
Audience: DOE and DOE-contractor employees who are experienced safety analysts and safety personnel and whose functional work activities involve preparing a documented safety analysis (DSA) or other safety documentation for DOE facilities.
Goals & Objectives: Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: 1) Describe the purpose, requirements, approaches, and process for preparing for hazard identification. 2) Describe the three broad classifications of undesirable consequences of hazard impacts as given in the CCPS Guidelines for Hazard Evaluation Procedures manual. 3) Describe the purpose, requirements, approaches, and process for completing a hazard identification table/checklist. 4) Conduct and document a facility walk-down to complete a hazard identification table/checklist.
Prerequisites: None

SAF-720DL, Hazard Identification

Delivery Method: Instructor Led Course
Length in Hours: 8
Description: THIS IS AN INSTRUCTOR LED COURSE VIA VIDEO TELECONFERENCE...This intermediate-level course, to be delivered using Distance Learning, is designed to provide safety analysts with the working knowledge and skills needed to identify, record, and screen all known facility hazards. The course discusses the various types of hazards that exist in the workplace and their "harm to humans" characteristics. It also covers the processes used to systematically identify and inventory hazardous conditions (material and energy sources) associated with a facility process or associated operation.
Audience: Experienced DOE and DOE-contractor safety analysts and safety personnel whose functional work activities involve preparing a documented safety analysis (DSA) or other safety documentation for DOE facilities.
Goals & Objectives: Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: 1) Describe the purpose, requirements, approaches, and process for preparing for hazard identification. 2) Describe the three broad classifications of undesirable consequences of hazard impacts as given in the CCPS Guidelines for Hazard Evaluation Procedures manual. 3) Describe the purpose, requirements, approaches, and process for completing a hazard identification table/checklist. 4) Conduct and document a facility walk-down to complete a hazard identification table/checklist.
Prerequisites: GEN-101DW, Introduction to Distance Learning

SAF-720DW, Hazard Identification

Delivery Method: Instructor Led Course
Length in Hours: 12
Description: THIS IS AN INSTRUCTOR LED COURSE VIA WEBEX/INTERNET. THE CLASS WILL BE TWO, FOUR HOUR SESSIONS OVER TWO CONSECUTIVE DAYS. This intermediate-level course, to be delivered using Distance Learning, is designed to provide safety analysts with the working knowledge and skills needed to identify, record, and screen all known facility hazards. The course discusses the various types of hazards that exist in the workplace and their "harm to humans" characteristics. It also covers the processes used to systematically identify and inventory hazardous conditions (material and energy sources) associated with a facility process or associated operation. REQUIRED TO TAKE GEN-101DW TO VERIFY CONNECTIVITY AND UNDERSTAND HOW TO USE THE PROGRAM.
Audience: Experienced DOE and DOE-contractor safety analysts and safety personnel whose functional work activities involve preparing a documented safety analysis (DSA) or other safety documentation for DOE facilities.
Goals & Objectives: Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: 1) Describe the purpose, requirements, approaches, and process for preparing for hazard identification. 2) Describe the three broad classifications of undesirable consequences of hazard impacts as given in the CCPS Guidelines for Hazard Evaluation Procedures manual. 3) Describe the purpose, requirements, approaches, and process for completing a hazard identification table/checklist. 4) Conduct and document a facility walk-down to complete a hazard identification table/checklist.
Prerequisites: GEN-101DL, Introduction to Distance Learning
GEN-101DW, Introduction to Distance Learning

SAF-725, Hazard Categorization

Delivery Method: Instructor Led Course
Length in Hours: 8
Description: This intermediate-level course is designed to provide safety analysts with the working knowledge and skills needed to conduct initial and final facility hazard categorization. This course also provides the knowledge and skills needed to function as a team member to determine nuclear facility hazard categorization preliminary to conducting hazard and accident analysis. RECOMMENDATIONS: This course is designed for safety analysts whose functional work activities will involve preparing a documented safety analysis (DSA) or other safety documentation for DOE facilities. Successful completion of SAF-701, Safety Basis Overview and/or SAF-715, Nuclear Safety Management prior to this course is recommended but not required.
Audience: Experienced DOE and DOE-contractor safety analysts and safety personnel who need to perform hazard categorization.
Goals & Objectives: Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to evaluate facility hazard information and determine the initial and final facility hazard categorization consistent with DOE-STD-1027-92 CH-1.
Prerequisites: None

SAF-725DL, Hazard Categorization

Delivery Method: Instructor Led Course
Length in Hours: 8
Description: THIS IS AN INSTRUCTOR LED COURSE VIA VIDEO TELECONFERENCE...This intermediate-level course is designed to provide safety analysts with the working knowledge and skills needed to conduct initial and final facility hazard categorization. This course also provides the knowledge and skills needed to function as a team member to determine nuclear facility hazard categorization preliminary to conducting hazard and accident analysis. RECOMMENDATIONS: This course is designed for safety analysts whose functional work activities will involve preparing a documented safety analysis (DSA) or other safety documentation for DOE facilities. Successful completion of SAF-701, Safety Basis Overview and/or SAF-715, Nuclear Safety Management prior to this course is recommended but not required.
Audience: Experienced DOE and DOE-contractor safety analysts and safety personnel who need to perform hazard categorization.
Goals & Objectives: Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to evaluate facility hazard information and determine the initial and final facility hazard categorization consistent with DOE-STD-1027-92 CH-1.
Prerequisites: GEN-101DW, Introduction to Distance Learning

SAF-725DW, Hazard Categorization

Delivery Method: Instructor Led Course
Length in Hours: 12
Description: THIS IS AN INSTRUCTOR LED COURSE VIA WEBEX/INTERNET. THE CLASS WILL BE TWO, FOUR HOUR SESSIONS OVER TWO CONSECUTIVE DAYS...This intermediate-level course is designed to provide safety analysts with the working knowledge and skills needed to conduct initial and final facility hazard categorization. This course also provides the knowledge and skills needed to function as a team member to determine nuclear facility hazard categorization preliminary to conducting hazard and accident analysis. RECOMMENDATIONS: This course is designed for safety analysts whose functional work activities will involve preparing a documented safety analysis (DSA) or other safety documentation for DOE facilities. Successful completion of SAF-701, Safety Basis Overview and/or SAF-715, Nuclear Safety Management prior to this course is recommended but not required. REQUIRED TO TAKE GEN-101DW TO VERIFY CONNECTIVITY AND UNDERSTAND HOW TO USE THE PROGRAM.
Audience: Experienced DOE and DOE-contractor safety analysts and safety personnel who need to perform hazard categorization.
Goals & Objectives: Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to evaluate facility hazard information and determine the initial and final facility hazard categorization consistent with DOE-STD-1027-92 CH-1.
Prerequisites: None

SAF-735, Hazard Evaluation Techniques

Delivery Method: Instructor Led Course
Length in Hours: 16
Description: This intermediate-level course focuses on general process and detailed process hazard studies. Techniques covered include the following: Checklist Analysis, PHA, What-If Analysis, What-If/Checklist Analysis, HAZOP Analysis, and FMEA. This course also provides the working knowledge and skills needed to perform a comprehensive assessment of facility hazards and to provide a qualitative risk perspective to help in decision making for risk reduction. These evaluation techniques may be used to perform hazard analyses at a DOE facility. HIGHLY RECOMMENDED: SAF-710 Safety Basis Document Preparation.
Audience: DOE and DOE-contractor safety analysts and safety personnel responsible for performing hazard evaluations.
Goals & Objectives: Upon successful completion of the course, students will possess: 1) A working knowledge of, and the skills needed to perform, a comprehensive assessment of facility hazards. 2) A qualitative risk perspective to help in decision making for risk reduction.
Prerequisites: None

SAF-735DL, Hazard Evaluation Techniques

Delivery Method: Instructor Led Course
Length in Hours: 16
Description: THIS IS AN INSTRUCTOR LED COURSE VIA VIDEO TELECONFERENCE...This intermediate-level course focuses on general process and detailed process hazard studies. Techniques covered include the following: Checklist Analysis, PHA, What-If Analysis, What-If/Checklist Analysis, HAZOP Analysis, and FMEA. This course also provides the working knowledge and skills needed to perform a comprehensive assessment of facility hazards and to provide a qualitative risk perspective to help in decision making for risk reduction. These evaluation techniques may be used to perform hazard analyses at a DOE facility. HIGHLY RECOMMENDED: SAF-710 Safety Basis Document Preparation.
Audience: DOE and DOE-contractor safety analysts and safety personnel responsible for performing hazard evaluations.
Goals & Objectives: Upon successful completion of the course, students will possess: 1) A working knowledge of, and the skills needed to perform, a comprehensive assessment of facility hazards. 2) A qualitative risk perspective to help in decision making for risk reduction.
Prerequisites: None

SAF-745, Airborne Release Fractions and Respirable Fractions

Delivery Method: Instructor Led Course
Length in Hours: 24
Description: This intermediate course provides working knowledge of the responsibilities, authorities, and considerations relating to nuclear safety basis document review and approval. HIGHLY RECOMMENDED: SAF-710 Safety Basis Document Preparation.
Audience: DOE and DOE-contractor safety analysts and safety personnel whose responsibilities include determining ARF/RF values for accident analyses and dose consequence calculations.
Goals & Objectives: Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to select the most applicable/representative ARF/RF values to estimate the potential airborne release of radiological materials.
Prerequisites: None

SAF-750, Analytical Modeling Techniques Overview

Delivery Method: Instructor Led Course
Length in Hours: 16
Description: This intermediate-level course is designed to familiarize safety analysts with selected analytical modeling codes (DOE Toolbox Codes) used in accident analyses in support of DOE facility safety basis document development.
Audience: DOE and DOE-contractor personnel responsible for using analytical modeling codes (DOE Toolbox Codes) in support of the development of DOE safety basis documents.
Goals & Objectives: Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to: 1) Describe the purpose of analytical modeling in accident analysis. 2) Describe the types of design basis accidents each Toolbox code is best suited to model. 3) Describe major strengths and limitations of each analytical modeling in the DOE Safety Analysis Toolbox. 4) Recommend the most appropriate analytical code(s) to model selected DOE facility design basis accidents (DBAs).
Prerequisites: None

SAF-755, MELCOR Accident Consequence Code System 2

Delivery Method: Instructor Led Course
Length in Hours: 24
Description: (MACCS2 version 1.13.1) This intermediate-level course provides safety analysts with a working knowledge of the MACCS2 radioactive material airborne dispersion modeling code used in accident analyses in support of DOE facility Documented Safety Analysis (DSA) development. RECOMMENDATIONS: Familiarity with 10 CFR 830, DOE-STD-3009-94, and DOE-STD-1189.
Audience: DOE and DOE-contractor safety analysts whose functional work activities involve documenting the results of analytical modeling of an accidental radioactive material release supporting preparation of a DOE facility DSA.
Goals & Objectives: Upon successful completion of the course, students will: 1) Understand and apply the radiological consequence requirements of DOE-STD-3009-94 CN3 Appendix A in MACCS2. 2) Understand basic radiological dispersion concepts used in MACCS2 and be able to perform simple manipulations with a Gaussian model. 3) Understand the basis for and software quality assurance aspects of software for determination of radiological consequences for DOE/NNSA safety basis analysis. 4) Understand the MACCS2 code with respect to its structure, input, and output. 5) Execute MACCS2 for safety basis applications.
Prerequisites: None

SAF-760, CFAST Modeling Code

Delivery Method: Instructor Led Course
Length in Hours: 32
Description: (CFAST version 5.1.1) This introductory course is designed to provide safety analysts and safety personnel with the knowledge and skills to use the Consolidated Model of Fire Growth and Smoke Transport (CFAST) modeling code in accident analyses to support the preparation of DOE facility safety basis documents. This course also covers the suitability of CFAST for modeling fire accidents, the strengths and weakness of CFAST, running CFAST, and the concepts from DOE-ED-4.2.1.4. This course assumes attendees have no prior exposure to CFAST. The course does not cover advanced applications and is a mixture of lecture and computer hands-on exercises. This is not a course in fire dynamics, but data sources and calculation methods to the use of CFAST are covered. RECOMMENDATIONS: 1) Laptop computer with Microsoft Excel and a mouse; 2) Basic understanding of fire-related accident scenarios; and 3) Ability to perform simple calculations with Microsoft Excel
Audience: DOE and DOE-contractor safety analysts and safety personnel responsible for conducting accident analyses in support of preparation of DOE facility safety basis documents.
Goals & Objectives: Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to: 1) Describe the CFAST analytical modeling code. 2) Describe applicable regimes for using CFAST in performing accident analysis. 3) Describe the default inputs and recommendations for using the CFAST modeling code. 4) Describe the equations and associated terms used in CFAST modeling. 5) Describe special conditions for using the CFAST modeling code. 6) Describe known weaknesses and limitations in the CFAST modeling code. 7) Describe the evaluation of a typical fire analysis problem in a DSA.
Prerequisites: None

SAF-765, ALOHA Modeling Code

Delivery Method: Instructor Led Course
Length in Hours: 20
Description: (ALOHA version 5.2.3) This intermediate-level course on the Areal Locations of Hazardous Atmospheres (ALOHA) modeling code is designed to provide safety analysts with a working knowledge of the ALOHA modeling code used in accident analyses in support of DOE facility safety basis document development.
Audience: DOE and DOE-contractor safety analysts and safety personnel responsible for conducting accident analyses in support of DOE facility safety basis document development.
Goals & Objectives: Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to describe the following concerning the ALOHA code: 1) Suitability of the modeling code for calculating chemical source terms and resulting downwind concentrations. 2) Major strengths and limitations of the modeling code. 3) How to model selected DOE facility chemical emergencies. 4) Use of the modeling code outputs in support of facility safety basis documents.
Prerequisites: None

SAF-766, ALOHA and EPIcode Modeling Code

Delivery Method: Instructor Led Course
Length in Hours: 16
Description: (ALOHA version 5.2.3, EPIcode version 7.0) This intermediate-level course provides safety analysts with a working knowledge of the Areal Locations of Hazardous Atmospheres (ALOHA) and Emergency Prediction Information Code (EPIcode) hazardous material dispersion modeling codes used in accident analyses in support of DOE facility Documented Safety Analysis (DSA) development. RECOMMENDATIONS: Familiarity with 10 CFR 830, DOE-STD-3009-94, and DOE-STD-1189.
Audience: DOE and DOE-contractor safety analysts whose functional work activities involve documenting the results of analytical modeling of an accidental chemical release in support of preparing a DOE facility DSA.
Goals & Objectives: Upon successful completion of the course, students will understand: 1) ALOHA and EPIcode hazardous material dispersion modeling codes and how they are used in accident analyses in support of DOE facility DSA development. 2) An overview the ALOHA and EPIcode analytical modeling codes. 3) Applicable regimes for using the ALOHA and EPIcode modeling codes in performing accident analysis. 4) The inputs and recommendations for using the ALOHA and EPIcode modeling codes in performing accident analysis. 5) The equations and associated terms used in ALOHA and EPIcode modeling. 6) The special conditions for using the Emergency Prediction Information Code (EPIcode). 7) Software limitations and areas of improvement when using the ALOHA and EPIcode modeling codes. 8) The input requirements for modeling the scenario, outputs from the calculations, and how results are factored into a DSA given a scenario that involves calculation of chemical source terms and resulting downwind concentrations using the ALOHA and EPIcode analytical modeling codes.
Prerequisites: None

SAF-775, EPIcode Modeling Code

Delivery Method: Instructor Led Course
Length in Hours: 8
Description: (EPIcode version 7.0) The intermediate-level course is designed to provide safety analysts and safety personnel with the knowledge and skills needed to use the Emergency Prediction Information Code (EPIcode) for accident analyses.
Audience: DOE and DOE-contractor safety analysts and safety personnel who are responsible for using EPIcode to conduct accident analyses in support of DOE facility safety basis document development.
Goals & Objectives: Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: 1) Describe applicable regimes for using EPIcode in performing accident analysis. 2) Describe the inputs and recommendations for using the EPIcode in performing accident analysis. 3) Describe the equations and associated terms used in the EPIcode. 4) Describe the special conditions for use of the EPIcode. 5) Describe software limitations and areas of improvement when using the EPIcode. 6) Given a scenario that involves calculation of chemical source terms and resulting downwind concentrations using the EPIcode analytical modeling codes, describe the input requirements for modeling the scenario, outputs from the calculation, and how results are factored in DSA.
Prerequisites: None

SAF-780, Accident Analysis Techniques

Delivery Method: Instructor Led Course
Length in Hours: 32
Description: This intermediate-level course is designed to provide safety analysts with the knowledge and skills needed to understand the formal quantification of a limited subset of accidents from the hazard evaluation of a nuclear and nonnuclear facility. The course also covers the general process used to carry forward a limited subset of accidents that bound the envelope of accident conditions to which a facility operation could be subjected. HIGHLY RECOMMENDED: SAF-710 Safety Basis Document Preparation.
Audience: DOE and DOE-contractor safety analysts and safety personnel responsible for accident analyses or who need to understand accident analyses techniques.
Goals & Objectives: Upon successful completion of the course, students will: 1) Possess a broad understanding of the purpose and use of conducting accident analysis for DOE hazardous material facilities. 2) Be able to describe the accident analysis process as it applies to a DOE hazardous material facility. (Modules 1–3). 3) Understand the chemical consequence analysis process for 40 CFR 68 risk management plans and applications to DOE facilities. (Module 4).
Prerequisites: None

SAF-783, Environmental Restoration, Deactivation, & Decommissioning Safety Basis

Delivery Method: Instructor Led Course
Length in Hours: 24
Description: This intermediate-level course provides the working knowledge and skills needed to understand the interrelationship between the Safety Basis program and the facility safety requirements for an environmental restoration and deactivation and decommissioning (ER/D&D) facility. This course will use examples of a fictional facility that is late in its operational life. Course activities will focus on transitioning this facility from operation through deactivation, long-term surveillance, maintenance, and culminating in decommissioning. HIGHLY RECOMMENDED: SAF-710 Safety Basis Document Preparation.
Audience: DOE and DOE-contractor safety analysts and safety personnel responsible for the Safety Basis requirements associated with ER/D&D facilities.
Goals & Objectives: Upon successful completion of this course, students will: 1) Understand the safety basis requirements and other project/safety requirements affecting D&D safety basis. 2) Explain primary safety basis activities and documents specific to ER/D&D as described in DOE-STD-1120-2005. 3) Transfer good practices and actual site examples to promote sharing of lessons learned.
Prerequisites: None

SAF-784, Review and Approval of Nuclear Safety Basis Documents

Delivery Method: Instructor Led Course
Length in Hours: 16
Description: This intermediate course provides working level knowledge of the responsibilities, authorities, and considerations relating to nuclear safety basis document review and approval. RECOMMENDATIONS: SAF-710, Safety Basis Document Preparation (DOE-STD-3009-94); SAF-783, Environmental Restoration, Deactivation, and Decommissioning Safety Basis; SAF-785, Technical Safety Requirements Developer; or equivalent experience participating on a safety basis review team for the review of a submitted documented safety analysis (DSA) and associated technical safety requirements.
Audience: DOE employees who are qualifying or already qualified as Nuclear Safety Specialists (NSS), and who engage in M&O Contractor safety basis document reviews and the development of Safety Evaluation Reports (SERs) and Safety Validation Reports (SVRs).
Goals & Objectives: Upon successful completion of this course, students will have working-level knowledge of the following: 1) Principles of the safety basis review and approval process, to include its purpose and relationship to pertinent requirements and guidance. 2) Responsibilities, authorities, and considerations relating to the safety basis and safety design basis review and approval process. 3) Basis for documented safety analysis (DSA) approval contained in an SER. 4) Basis for TSRs approval contained in an SER. 5) The structure and content of an SER. 6) The structure and content of safety basis documents for design phases of a project.
Prerequisites: None

SAF-785, Technical Safety Requirements Implementation and Development

Delivery Method: Instructor Led Course
Length in Hours: 32
Description: This intermediate-level course provides students with the basic knowledge and skills needed to implement and develop Technical Safety Requirements (TSRs) in accordance with requirements of 10 CFR 830 and concepts from DOE Guide 423.1-1A in a manner that is acceptable for DOE/NNSA approval and assures that TSR controls could be implemented. HIGHLY RECOMMENDED: SAF-710 Safety Basis Document Preparation.
Audience: Experienced DOE and DOE-contractor personnel who will be supporting the implementation, preparation and/or review of TSRs.
Goals & Objectives: Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: 1) Understand the basic information and instructions for implementing TSRs in a manner that is consistent with DOE G 423.1-1A, including understanding how to implement limiting conditions for operation (LCOs) and surveillance requirements (SRs). 2) Develop TSRs in accordance with 10 CFR 830, Nuclear Safety and DOE G 423.1-1A, Implementation Guide for Use in Developing Technical Safety Requirements. 3) Understand the development of the general LCOs and SRs section of a TSR document. 4) Apply the local TSR document to the implementation of site safety requirements in accordance with DOE G 423.1-1A. 5) Understand the content, required format, general purpose, and key concepts represented in DOE G 423.1-1A Section 5.0, Administrative Controls (ACs), in TSRs. 6) Select structures, systems and components (SSCs) requiring inclusion in the design feature appendix and write design feature statements that meet the intent of 10 CFR 830.205 and DOE G 423.1-1A.
Prerequisites: None

SAF-785DV, Technical Safety Requirements Developer

Delivery Method: eLearning
Length in Hours: 5.5
Description: This course is a video presentation of a one day seminar covering material from SAF-785, Technical Safety Requirement Developer and Implementation. This video provides a general overview of the technical safety requirement development and implementation process.
Audience: DOE and DOE contractor personnel
Goals & Objectives: Upon successful completion of this online video, students should be familiar with: 1) Developing technical safety requirements (TSR) in accordance with 10 CFR 830, Nuclear Safety and DOE G 423.1-1A, Implementation Guide for Use in Developing Technical Safety Requirements. 2) Basic information and instructions for using and applying the TSRs in a manner consistent with DOE G 423.1-1A. 3) Implementing limiting conditions for operation (LCOs) and surveillance requirements (SRs). 4) The development of the general LCOs and SRs section of a TSR document. 5) The content, required format, general purpose, and key concepts represented in DOE G 423.1-1A Section 5.0, Administrative Controls (ACs), in technical safety requirements (TSRs). 6) Selecting structures, systems and components (SSCs) requiring inclusion in the design feature appendix and the development of design feature statements that meet the intent of 10 CFR 830.205 and DOE G 423.1-1A.
Prerequisites: None

SAF-786, Unreviewed Safety Question

Delivery Method: Instructor Led Course
Length in Hours: 32
Description: This intermediate-level course presents the requirements and intent of 10 CFR Part 830, Nuclear Safety Management, Regulations Subpart B, Section 830.203, and DOE G 424.1-1B Ch 2, Implementation Guide for Use in Addressing Unreviewed Safety Question Requirements. The course covers the purpose, terminology, and key aspects specific to the Unreviewed Safety Question (USQ) process. This course also incorporates the most recent USQ application/implementation guidance from DOE Headquarters. HIGHLY RECOMMENDED: SAF-710 Safety Basis Document Preparation. RECOMMENDATIONS: SAF-710, Safety Basis Document Preparation. Students should be familiar with 10 CFR Part 830.203, Unreviewed Safety Question Process and DOE G 424.1-1B Chg 2. In addition, students should have a basic understanding of the safety basis overview in DOE-STD-3009-94, Preparation Guide for U.S. Department of Energy Nonreactor Nuclear Facility Documented Safety Analyses. SAF-785, Technical Safety Requirements Developer.
Audience: DOE and DOE-contractor employees who are involved with the preparation, review, and approval of the USQ process. This may include facility management, safety analysts, operations personnel, DOE program management, and DOE facility representatives.
Goals & Objectives: Upon successful completion of this course, students will: 1) Understand USQ process, its purpose, its relationship to the safety basis, and sources of pertinent requirements and guidance. 2) Understand significant safety basis terminology and concepts that are required for implementation of the USQ process. 3) Understand types of facility changes, procedure changes, or tests and experiments that the USQ process needs to address in order to comply with 10 CFR 830.203. 4) Understand the unreviewed safety question determination (USQD) process. 5) Understand USQ screening and categorical exclusions. 6) Understand the USQ screening and categorical exclusions. 7) Understand how the USQ review process should be implemented.
Prerequisites: None

SAF-795, Packaging and Transportation Safety Basis

Delivery Method: Instructor Led Course
Length in Hours: 24
Description: The intermediate-level course provides working knowledge and skills to understand the development of safety basis documentation necessary to support facility packaging and transportation operations. The course also covers the general processes used to meet safety and quality assurance requirements of 10 CFR Part 71, 10 CFR 830, and DOE directives.
Audience: DOE and DOE-contractor safety analysts, safety personnel, or those interested in (or whose responsibilities include) preparing Packaging and Transportation Safe Harbors per 10 CFR 830 Subpart B.
Goals & Objectives: Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to describe the following: 1) 10 CFR 830, packaging and transportation (P&T) activities for hazardous materials. 2) 49 CFR Parts 100-85, off-site shipment of hazardous materials. 3) Packaging documentation for on-site shipment of hazardous materials 4) Safety Analysis Reports for Packaging (SARP) and TSD preparation that satisfies expectations of DOE G 460.1-1. 5) Implementation of Safety Assessment Methodology as described in DOE O 461.1B. 6) Packaging, transfer, and transportation activities for materials of national security interest. 7) Requirements of DOE O 460.1C and DOE G 460.1-1.
Prerequisites: None
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SAS - Safeguards & Security Courses and Training

SAS-101DE, Module1 Security General Technical Base

Delivery Method: eLearning
Length in Hours: 2
Description: This course is available online from the NTC's Learning Management System (LMS). You may launch and complete the course per course instructions. NOTE: You do not need to contact the NTC Registration Department to take this course. A completion will be automatically added to your Learning History. You should print the completion certificate from your Learning History and provide a copy to your training administrator or supervisor. COURSE DESCRIPTON: The General Technical Base Qualification Standard online training course for security personnel consists of only the fifteen lessons from the Safety General Technical Base course required for security personnel. This course is intended to support security employees in the Technical Qualification Program by providing instruction on important concepts in the General Technical Base Qualification Standard including appropriate reference material. The course includes an exam for each competency. These exams are primarily intended to reinforce learning but they can also serve as a record of the students' understanding of the topics. AUDIENCE: Federal security personnel who are responsible for the safe operation of defense nuclear facilities or who provide assistance, direction, guidance, oversight, or evaluation of contractor technical activities affecting the safe operation of defense nuclear facilities.
Audience: DOE employees who must satisfy the requirements of DOE-STD-1123-2009, Safeguards & Security General Technical Base Qualifications Standard, competencies 15-32.
Goals & Objectives: Upon successful completion of this course, students will be adequately familiar with the subject or process and be able to discuss the subject or process with individuals of greater knowledge.
Prerequisites: None

SAS-110W, Security Awareness Coordinator

Delivery Method: Instructor Led Course
Length in Hours: 4
Description: Held in conjunction with the Security Awareness Special Interest Group (SASIG)
Audience: Individuals working in Safeguards and Security (S&S) Awareness Programs with DOE.
Goals & Objectives: Upon successful completion of this course, students will be familiar with: 1) The purpose of the DOE Security Awareness Program. 2) Areas where a DOE Security Awareness Program is applicable. 3) Various roles/functions of the DOE Security Awareness Coordinator position. 4) Supplementary Security Awareness Program activities.
Prerequisites: None

WPV-101DE, Workplace Violence Awareness Briefing

Delivery Method: eLearning
Length in Hours: 0.67
Description: This beginner-level eLearning course presents a basic overview workplace violence awareness.
Audience: All DOE and DOE contractor personnel
Goals & Objectives: 1) Recognize and respond to warning signs of potential workplace violence 2) Plan and prepare for a workplace violence incident 3) Recognize and respond correctly to a workplace violence incident
Prerequisites: None
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Sustainability Courses and Training

Air Pollution 101DE

Delivery Method: eLearning
Length in Hours: 0.5
Description: The Air Pollution 101 training course is designed to familiarize DOE employees and contractors with the fundamentals of Federal air pollution control requirements as they apply to their facility. This course does not require the participant to have prior experience with air pollution issues. The course is divided into modules addressing specific aspects of air pollution management, which may be viewed at one sitting or at multiple sittings. Highlighted text is provided throughout the course to direct students to the course "Resource Center" tab, which will connect them to sources of more detailed information. This is a "living course" that will be updated continually as air pollution requirements and management techniques change. The user community is encouraged to suggest improvements in content, organization, and delivery of the course. For additional information, please contact Shab Fardanesh, Office of Sustainability Support (HS-21), 202-586-7011, Shabnam.fardanesh@hq.doe.gov.
Audience: DOE and DOE-contractor employees with a need to know more about air pollution
Goals & Objectives: Upon successful completion of this course, students will have an understanding of the fundamentals of Federal air pollution control requirements as they apply to their facility.
Prerequisites: None

Scope 3 Indirect Greenhouse Gas Emissions: A Guide for Meeting DOE's FY 2020 Targets

Delivery Method: eLearning
Length in Hours: 1
Description: This entry-level eLearning course serves as a guide for assisting DOE sites, as environmental stewards, in reducing greenhouse gas, or GHG, emissions to attain a 13 percent reduction in Scope 3 indirect GHGs by fiscal year 2020. Designed for a wide audience, this course presents a multitude of perspectives on Scope 3 reduction. Included are the general terminology, concepts, and drivers for this goal, as well as tools you will need to implement an effective program to achieve that reduction goal. It defines a 4-step management process as an informal methodology for achieving that goal with specific examples in the various Scope 3 emissions categories.
Audience: All DOE and DOE-contractor employees
Goals & Objectives: Upon completion of this course, the audience will have an understanding of greenhouse gas emissions as they relate to the DOE roles and responsibilities, particularly with regard to Scope 3 indirect emissions. For those who may benefit, a general planning methodology for meeting DOE’s FY2020 GHG reduction goals is described.
Prerequisites: None

Sustainable Acquisition at the U.S. Department of Energy

Delivery Method: eLearning
Length in Hours:
Description: The purpose of this lesson is to enable learners to recognize and comply with federal and Department of Energy (DOE) sustainability requirements prior to, as well as during, the purchase of products and services, and the benefits that result to the Department, the community, and the environment from compliance with these requirements.
Audience:
Goals & Objectives: The purpose of this lesson is to enable learners to recognize and comply with federal and Department of Energy (DOE) sustainability requirements prior to, as well as during, the purchase of products and services, and the benefits that result to the Department, the community, and the environment from compliance with these requirements.
Prerequisites: None
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VA - Vulnerability Assessment Courses and Training

VAP-140, Vulnerability Assessment Fundamentals

Delivery Method: Instructor Led Course
Length in Hours: 32
Description: This entry-level course introduces students to the fundamental concepts of the safeguards and security (S&S) vulnerability assessment (VA) process, including the philosophy, concepts, and terminology associated with the process. The course provides students with an introduction to the critical steps in the VA process, including how to identify targets, define threats, characterize the protection system of facilities, and conduct elementary insider and outsider analyses. The course requires that students learn and apply the mathematics required to perform the various VA analyses in support of determining system effectiveness. Students should be familiar with DOE/NNSA S&S systems and associated DOE directives. This course is not designed to produce qualified VA team members but to reinforce fundamental concepts and prepare students to function as entry-level members of a VA team. RECOMMENDED:PHY-100DE, Physical Protection Systems Overview. A basic familiarity with S&S systems and terminology is also recommended. EQUIPMENT: Pocket calculator.
Audience: DOE and DOE-contractor personnel who are or will be involved in conducting, verifying, or validating VAs, and VA trainers.
Goals & Objectives: Upon successful completion of this course, students will: 1) Be able to identify the critical steps in the VA process. 2) Understand the philosophy, concepts, and terminology associated with the process. 3) Be able to apply the new knowledge and skills as productive members of VA teams.
Prerequisites: None

VAP-240, ASSESS-ATLAS

Delivery Method: Instructor Led Course
Length in Hours: 36
Description: The ASSESS and ATLAS software programs comprise a systematic approach for evaluating safeguards and security (S&S) effectiveness against theft or sabotage of special nuclear material by different adversaries (e.g., insiders, outsiders, collusion). This course provides instruction about specific program features and modules and how they function. REQUIREMENTS: Computer literacy with ability to use Windows. This course can be presented/hosted/funded by individual sites. The NTC will manage the course materials, registration, and scheduling for VAP-240 ASSESS-ATLAS. Sites can contact the NTC for the presentation requirements of VAP-240 ASSESS-ATLAS. NOTE: A one year lead time is required for scheduling.
Audience: DOE and DOE-contractor personnel who are directly responsible for VA trainers and for conducting vulnerability assessments.
Goals & Objectives: Upon successful completion of this course, students will: 1) Navigate the fundamental functions in the ASSESS and ATLAS programs. 2) Perform a basic analysis of a simple facility using a combination of both software programs.
Prerequisites: VAP-140, Vulnerability Assessment Fundamentals

VAP-316, Vulnerability Assessment Baseline

Delivery Method: Instructor Led Course
Length in Hours: 64
Description: This intermediate-level course presents a more comprehensive treatment of the VA process, with emphasis on gathering the information necessary to conduct a VA that is compliant with the Graded Security Protection (GSP) Policy and the VA Technical Standard, and which is sufficient for use in any of the several modeling tools currently available. IMPORTANT: To register for this course, prospective students must have an active access authorization at the Q level; provide their name, site, and contact information for Q verification by NTC Security; and have current assignment as a VA analyst, performance tester, or VA trainer. It is recommended the student be familiar with the use of VA modeling software such as ASSESS-ATLAS, Simajin, AVERT, etc.
Audience: DOE and DOE-contractor VA analysts, performance testers, and VA trainers with the responsibility for conducting, reviewing, or validating VAs.
Goals & Objectives: Upon successful completion of this course, students will have a basic understanding of the following: 1) Facility and protective force characterization and assigning figures of merit. 2) Characterization of insider-attack vulnerabilities. 3) Development of outsider scenarios that address the requirements of DOE O 470.3B, Graded Security Protection (GSP) Policy. 4) Target characterization. 5) Use of qualitative techniques (such as tabletops) in the conduct of a VA. 6) Strengths and weaknesses of computer-based modeling tools. 7) Neutralization analysis using DOE-approved tools and techniques. 8) Requirements for conduct of sabotage analyses.
Prerequisites: VAP-140, Vulnerability Assessment Fundamentals
PHY-100DE, Physical Protection Systems Overview
PHY-100DB Introduction to Physical Protection Systems

VAP-335, Fundamentals of Performance Testing

Delivery Method: Instructor Led Course
Length in Hours: 38
Description: This baseline-level course presents a comprehensive overview of the performance testing process, with emphasis on understanding the identification of essential elements and assisting performance testers in the development of protocol documents and specific performance tests to validate what the VA analyst believes to be the correct values to determine system effectiveness by gathering the data from the performance test, then inputting the results in any of the several modeling tools currently available to determine if their estimates were correct. It is recommended the student be familiar with the use of VA modeling software such as ASSESS-ATLAS, Simajin, AVERT, etc. EQUIPMENT: Pocket calculator
Audience: This audience consists of DOE and DOE-contractor Safeguards and Security personnel, performance testers, and VA trainers directly involved in the actual conduct, review, or verification of performance testing which supports the VA process and who have successfully completed the prerequisites. This course also may be appropriate for experienced personnel who are responsible for reviewing/verifying VA results, developing performance test plans, and participating in the performance testing process.
Goals & Objectives: Upon successful completion of the course, students will have an understanding of the knowledge and skills required to assist performance testers in the development, planning, and writing of performance testing protocol documents that will support and retrieve the performance-testing objectives and the execution of performance tests as related to EE and EE testing to be conducted at a DOE facility.
Prerequisites: PHY-100DE, Physical Protection Systems Overview
PHY-100DB Introduction to Physical Protection Systems
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